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Archive for the 'Pet Auto Travel Safety' Category

September 30, 2014

Want to know how a dog car harness secures your dog? You’d think the answer would be simple. In a way, it is. For most, it is as simple as clipping it on and clipping it in. But what makes it complicated is that each brand works differently. Let’s take the top 5 brands and show you how each of them work:

ClickIt Utility
The ClickIt Utility dog car harness has three connection points. This makes it one of the most labor intensive to use, but also the safest. First, put the seat belt of the car through the back of the harness. Then connect the two tethers on either side of the harness to each of the two latchbars located between the seat cushions. All cars 2001 and later should have the latchbars in the back seat.

Please note, the new ClickIt Sport coming out soon will not have the two side tethers.

Close-Up of the ClickIt Utility Strap to Latchbar

This metal bar is located between the seat cushions of cars. There are two on either side of the seats, for a total of four. Clip the ClickIt tethers to these latchbars.

Tether of the ClickIt Utility Dog Safety Belt

These two tethers attach to the latchbars located between the rear seat cushions, and in turn attach to the side of the ClickIt Utility dog safety belt.

Seat Belt Through Back of ClickIt Utility Dog Car Harness

Put the seat belt of the car through the back of the ClickIt Utility harness then clip the tethers onto either side.

Diagram of ClickIt Utility Dog Car Harness

This diagram of the ClickIt Utility dog car harness shows the connections better.

Ruff Rider Roadie
The Ruff Rider Roadie also uses the seat belt of the car to secure your dog. Instead of going through the back of the harness, it goes through one of two loops on the tether. This tether is part of the harness and is not detachable. To give your dog more room to move, put the seat belt through the loop at the very end of the tether. To secure your dog more for safety, put the seat belt through the loop closer to the back of the harness.

The Two Loops in Ruff Rider Roadie Dog Car Harness

Put the seat belt of the car through one of the two loops of the tether on the Ruff Rider Roadie.

Ruff Rider Roadie Dog Car Harness on Pierson

This is the seat belt of the car through the loop closest to the back of the Ruff Rider Roadie.

AllSafe Dog Seat Belt
The AllSafe is also takes a bit more work to secure. First, you have to stabilize the seat belt of the car. Buckle it in without your dog. Then use the two red clips included with the harness to stabilize it. If the top part of the shoulder belt is like the picture indicated, then stabilizing is easy. If it is like mine where it comes out directly, then it can get a little troublesome. You have to make the shoulder belt lock, and then apply the red clip. This way the shoulder belt does not pull out when your dog moves. Once you have it stabilized, attach the tether to the seat belt. Once this is done, all you have to do is clip the tether onto the back off the AllSafe dog car harness.

The Top Clip of the AllSafe Dog Seat Belt

Stabilize the top of the seat belt of the car using one of the red clips provided by AllSafe.

Red Clip of the AllSafe Dog Seat Belt

If the seat belt of your car does not work like in the diagram above, lock the seat belt in place by pulling it hard, and then placing the red clip so it can’t go back in or out.

Secured Seat Belt for AllSafe Dog Harness

Once the seat belt is stabilized so that it doesn’t pull out, put the AllSafe dog car harness tether onto the strap.

Back of AllSafe Dog Seat Belt

Clip the tether onto the back of the AllSafe dog seat belt.

Bergan Dog Car Harness
The Bergan brand is very easy to secure in the car. Either clip one end into the seat belt housing of the car, or clip it onto the latchbar. Then clip the other end to the back of the harness.

Clip the Bergan Tether Between Seat Belt

The Bergan dog car harness tether clips between the webbing of the seat belt buckle.

Bergan Seat Belt Tether on Latch Bar

The Bergan dog seat belt tether can also clip onto the latchbar.

Bobo Secured with a Bergan Dog Seat Belt

The other end of the Bergan dog seat belt tether clips onto the back of Bobo’s harness.

Kurgo Dog Seat Belt
The Kurgo Tru-Fit and the Kurgo Go Tech brands are also very easy to use. Simply put the seat belt of the car through the loop tether, and then clip the other end of the loop tether to the back of the harness. Kurgo also has the option to buy a direct connect tether, which clips directly into the seat belt receptacle.

Loop Tether of Kurgo Dog Seat Belt

The seat belt of the car goes through the loop tether of the Kurgo dog car harness.

Alternate Kurgo Dog Seat Belt Connection

To make the loop tether of the Kurgo dog car harness more secure, loop it like this around the seat belt.

Kurgo Direct Connect Tether for Dog Car Harness

The Kurgo direct connect tether is purchased separately. It can buckle directly into the seat belt of the car for attachment to a dog car harness.

Buckle Strap for Dog Car Harness

The Kurgo direct connect tether clips onto the back of the harness and buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle.

Which Dog Car Harness is Best?
Determining which dog seat belt is best depends on your preference. While the Bergan and Kurgo are the easiest to attach, the ClickIt, Ruff Rider, and AllSafe are the safest. At the same times, the safest brand may also be the most uncomfortable for some dogs because they can’t move much. Keep this in mind and balance safety with your dog’s comfort. A super-safe dog car harness is not going to help if your pet is so uncomfortable that he chews it off.

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September 26, 2014
Maya Labrador AllSafe Dog Car Harness

The AllSafe dog car harness fits Maya perfectly!

One great thing about running Pet Auto Safety is that we get to try out all the products. Our recent acquisition is the AllSafe dog seat belt. And the lucky dog that gets to try it out is our lovely Labrador Retriever, Maya.

Maya presents a number of challenges when it comes to dog car harnesses because she doesn’t sit still. She’s got to stand up and stick her little brown nose wherever she can get it, sometimes in my ear. She also has a deep narrow chest, which occasionally makes harnesses pull to the side rather than hug the chest. Did we have these issues with the AllSafe? Let’s see.

QUALITY
First, though, let me give you my first impression of the AllSafe dog car harness. When I pulled it out of the box, I was absolutely amazed. The quality is fantastic. It is obviously very well made and highly durable. The straps are thick and sewn together very well. There are no plastic pieces on this seat belt, just strong webbing and very strong steel parts.

PUTTING ON/TAKING OFF
The AllSafe dog car harness does not clip on like most other dog seat belts do. As demonstrated in the below video, you have to pull your dog’s legs through the leg holes. Maya makes it look easy, but I can see how this might be a challenge for other dogs that are not yet used wearing a car harness. Because of my experience and because of Maya’s cooperation, I personally found the AllSafe very easy to put on.

SECURING IN THE CAR
It was very simple to secure my dog Maya in the car with her AllSafe harness. There was a bit of a misunderstanding with the instructions. Apparently, my box had the wrong instructions. But when I notified the company located here in the US, they walked me through the right way. Their customer service was fantastic.

RIDING AROUND
Maya wore her harness perfectly. She could still stand up, sit, or lie down, but enough that she could stick her wet brown nose into my ear. This restriction is a good thing because it means if we are in a car accident, Maya will not be jerked around. A longer tether means more freedom and comfort, but it also means less security. I find the ClickIt the most restrictive and the Bergan the least. On the other hand, the Bergan is more comfortable and the ClickIt is the least. The AllSafe is right in between both.

FIT
The chest piece of the AllSafe still went off to the side if Maya tried to move around. But that is Maya’s fault because she won’t be still. If Pierson were to wear this harness, he would not have any trouble at all because he stays in one spot.

COMPARISON
The AllSafe is very comparable to the ClickIt Utility in both quality and safety. The ClickIt Utility had a better safety rating from the Center for Pet Safety, but the AllSafe rated nearly as well. One drawback of the ClickIt Utility is it has three connection points that can make it more of a hassle to secure your dog in the car. It can also be more difficult to adjust for sizing. (Both these features of the ClickIt Utility are changing, though, with the release of the ClickIt Sport before the end of this year.) The AllSafe allows for the harness to be used as a walking harness much easier than the ClickIt Utility.

Overall, I am very pleased with the AllSafe. It is more expensive than most brands, but it is worth every penny.

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September 18, 2014

Barks and Bytes Blog Hop

Welcome to another edition of Barks & Bytes hosted by Jodi with Heart Like a Dog and Linda with 2BrownDawgs.

It’s been a month since our last participation in the Barks & Bytes blog hop so we have a lot to cover. I’ll try very hard to be brief. First off, if you haven’t done so already, say Happy Birthday to my Maya who turned 7 at the end of August!

IMPROVED PET DEK
In a review of the Pet Dek that I made back in July, I mentioned how one of the legs kept coming off but I fixed it with a washer. The manufacturer of the Pet Dek saw my post and wanted to let me know that this issue has been fixed and is no longer a concern. Honest reviews really pay off!

FREE SHIPPING ON FLAT SEAT
The Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat is a comparable product and for the month of September, we are offering free shipping.

Belle-Button the Frenchie Wearing the Bergan Dog Seat Belt 3

Belle is wearing the Bergan dog seat belt as she rests comfortably in her pet bed in the back seat for the road trip.

FRENCHIES REVIEW
On Wednesday, September 10th, we shared the photos of three adorable Frenchies: Arnold, Belle, and Wilbur. Their mom first purchased the Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat from us. And when she found out we were also in Iowa, she explained how difficult it has been for her to find a dog car seat belt that would fit the odd shape of a Frenchie. And so I offered to visit her in person to try some on. The Kurgo Tru-Fit brand fit them nicely, but the Bergan dog seat belt fit even better. So Arnold, Belle, and Wilbur all have one and they wore them on their recent road trip.

My Dog Pierson with a Woman Named Flea

Does Pierson want pets or does he want goodies from Jones Natural Chews? Flea gives him both.

FLEA!
If you haven’t heard of Flea from DogTreatWeb for Jones Natural Chews, then you’re really missing out. Her blog is funny and Flea is such a heartwarming person. We (Maya, Pierson, and I) have been lucky enough to have been able to meet her on two occasions. Once, during the holidays when we made our annual road trip from Kansas to Texas. And the second time just a couple of days ago as she traveled from Oklahoma to Illinois. It was a wonderful visit and Maya and Pierson were extremely spoiled with the Boo Bucket and other treats from Jones Natural Chews.

Maya Labrador AllSafe Dog Car Harness

The AllSafe dog car harness fits Maya perfectly!

ALLSAFE
Remember earlier in the year where I mentioned one of our goals was to acquire the AllSafe dog car harness? Well, we finally got it! As of yesterday, the AllSafe pet seat belt is officially available on PetAutoSafety.com. For now, it has free shipping. This may change later so if you’ve been wanting one, now is the time to get one. Maya has hers already. Keep an eye out on this blog for our review.

VARIOCAGE
The company that provides the AllSafe dog seat belt also has the VarioCage. If you haven’t heard of it before, it is the absolute best car cage on the market. We don’t have this one on our website yet, but it will be available before the end of the month.

LOST DOG COMMENTS
A special thanks to Barbara from K9sOverCoffee and Lindsay with ThatMutt for adding two more means to find a dog lost after a car accident. Post fliers, contact a radio station to see if they will mention the lost pet, and contact shelters and rescue groups every day to see if anyone has brought in the pet. I can’t believe I didn’t think of these. Thank you!!!

PET TRAVEL ARTICLES
And thank you to Patrice for writing these great pet travel articles for us:
Plan a Great Pet Friendly Trip
Finding Pet Friendly Accommodations

Thanks for stopping by, everyone and enjoy the rest of your week! :)

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September 16, 2014

My Dogs in Back of SUV

Having your dog wear a dog seat belt in the vehicle is a great way to keep them from distracting the driver. But you also want them to be safe, right? However, if your dog rides in the cargo area of your hatchback or SUV, you need to know that securing them to cargo rings may not be adequate.

The Center for Pet Safety, a nonprofit research facility for pet products, has recently reported that cargo connections may not have the necessary strength to hold your dog. This means the cargo ring can break if your dog is in a car accident, or even if your dog just pulls on it hard enough. Contact the vehicle manufacturer to find out what amount of force those cargo rings can withstand.

When we rented an SUV one year in order to make our annual trip from Kansas to Texas, we looked diligently for an SUV that had metal connections in the cargo area for Maya and Pierson. We did not find any. As a result, we found a way to connect their dog seat belt harnesses to the safety belt housing of the car located under the seat. However, the Center for Pet Safety advises against this as well.

If you need to have your dog ride in the cargo area, you may need to install a more secure connection in the cargo area. You can also opt to have your dog ride in a crate instead. Just be sure the crate can be secured in place.

We will soon have another option for dogs riding in cargo areas. By the end of September, you will see the VarioCage available on our PetAutoSafety.com retail site. The VarioCage is very expensive but it is also extremely durable. It has been extensively crash tested and even real-life situations have shown that the VarioCage remains intact.

Safety for our pets when we travel is very important and vehicle manufacturers are coming to realize this. More and more car commercials show a dog harnessed in the car. So if you have a vehicle with a cargo area and it doesn’t have cargo rings or just has plastic cargo rings, tell the manufacturer that you want this feature. You may not be able to get it this time around, but they will hear you and hopefully install better connections in future models.

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September 10, 2014

These three cute little Frenchies went on a road trip recently:

Arnold the Frenchie Wearing the BerganDog Car Harness 2

Arnold enjoyed his road trip so much that he dreamed about it. :)

Belle-Button the Frenchie Wearing the Bergan Dog Seat Belt 4

Belle, nicknamed Belle-Button, is snug as bug in the back seat of the car.

Belle-Button the Frenchie Wearing the Bergan Dog Seat Belt 3

Belle is wearing the Bergan dog seat belt as she rests comfortably in her pet bed in the back seat for the road trip.

Wilbur the Frenchie Wearing the Bergan Dog Seat Belt 1

Wilbur is also wearing the Bergan dog seat belt in the car. Actually, all three of these Frenchies are wearing the Bergan because it was the one that fit their odd body size the best.

I’m so glad Arnold, Belle, and Wilbur’s mom shared these with us. Aren’t these Frenchies just the cutest?

For more adorable pet photos, check out the Wordless Wednesday blog hop below:

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September 9, 2014

Rear End Front End Car Accident

We read a lot of articles about pet travel and have come across more than a few handfuls where a dog involved in a car accident runs away from the scene and is lost for days. We’ve also followed up with many of these articles and have learned the situations where the dog is found. Most of these reunions have elements in common that can help you if your dog escapes from a terrifying situation.

Return to the Scene
Believe it or not, in most cases where a dog runs away after being in a car accident, he is found within less than a mile of the scene. In some cases, he is actually found at or near the area where the wreck took place. If the accident is on a busy roadway, he is probably going to stay some distance back. Look in nearby areas with lots of foliage or other places to hide.

Trauma Makes Dogs Wary
A dog involved in a traumatic situation is very likely to be skittish with strangers, even normally friendly dogs. If you are helping to locate someone’s lost dog, make sure you have their number handy. If the dog moves away from you when you approach, stop approaching them and call for help.

Live Traps
Since traumatized dogs tend to be shy, putting live traps in areas where there have been sightings can help you catch him when you’re not around. A shy dog may also avoid broad daylight. He may hide during the day, and then seek food and water in darker hours. A live trap will help attract the dog and hopefully catch him when people aren’t able to be out searching.

Tell Everyone
Alert nearby neighbors, notify the local animal shelter and animal control, let the police know, and contact local rescue groups for help. Perhaps even call the local news stations. More than any of the others, individuals from dog rescue groups seem to be the people who most often answer the call to help. They can also be a great resource for getting live traps. Contacting local vet clinics is also a good idea for in case someone brings in a dog that needs medical attention.

Social Media Helps
There are a number of Facebook pages dedicated to finding lost pets. Sometimes pages are created by a family attempting to locate their own lost pet. The people who come together to help are amazing. They share posts, thereby spreading the word about a lost pet, they offer personal assistance with looking for the pet, or they may even have other ways to help. If your dog is missing, post it on CraigsList, Facebook, G+, Twitter, community classifieds, and anything else you can think of.

Protect Yourself from Scammers
Because you are posting the information about your dog publicly, there is a chance you will be contacted by scammers claiming to have found your dog but are wanting money before they return him. The most common scam is from people claiming they were traveling when they found your dog and they want money before they make the long drive back. Don’t fall for it. It is a good idea to withhold a very specific trait about your dog when posting public lost ads. Perhaps your dog has a scar somewhere or a specific mark that is not noticeable in photographs. If a person claiming to have your dog is unwilling to verify specific marks, then they probably don’t really have your dog. A person with the heart enough to pick up an abandoned dog is not likely to ask you for money or be difficult about getting the dog back to you. However, if you are convinced that such a person may, in fact, have your dog, insist on meeting them in person and in a public place before giving them money and see if the police will escort you.

Many of these tips can help in other situations, not just a car accident. If you have any additional tips that might help, please comment below.

(This is not an official study. It is merely an observation we’ve made based on online reports. There are probably a number of situations that were not reported and may not fit in these scenarios. If you’ve lost your pet, consider all options and don’t give up.)

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September 4, 2014

Road Trip with the Dogs to Kansas

I posted a little bit about my road trip with my dogs, Maya and Pierson, on my American Dog Blog, but I thought I would share a few more details here. Namely, what I did to prepare and how we made sure our travel was comfortable and safe.

TO TAKE THE DOGS OR NOT TO TAKE THE DOGS
A few months ago, I made arrangements to see an alternative medicine doctor for my fibromyalgia in Wichita, Kansas. It is a five-and-a-half hour drive so we opted to drive. As always, we had to take the dogs into consideration. Despite living in Iowa for only a short time, we have met people we could trust to care for our dogs if we left. However, my husband couldn’t go and as a female I didn’t want to travel alone. And so I opted to take both dogs with me.

Motel 6 August 2014 Maya & Pierson

ACCOMMODATIONS
I would have two doctor visits on two consecutive days, so we needed a place to stay. The medical office gave me a list of nearby hotels. However, they either didn’t allow pets at all, only allowed pets under 20lbs, or charged over $100+ per night. And so I chose the trusty Motel 6. I knew they were both inexpensive and pet friendly. And after our recent pleasant experience at a Motel 6 in Oklahoma, I hoped the one in Wichita would be the same. I was not disappointed. Check out my reviews of this Motel 6 on my American Dog Blog from both the link above and from the August 29, 2014 post.

> Don’t Leave Dogs Alone in Hotel Room
One thing I did not take into consideration during my stay at Motel 6 is that you are not supposed to leave your pets unattended in the room. I should have made doggie day care arrangements for Maya and Pierson, but didn’t think about it.

Most hotels have this rule about leaving pets and I understand why. When some dogs are left alone, they bark or will do damage to the room. Also, there could be problems when the cleaning staff tries to enter the room. Thankfully, Maya and Pierson are familiar with traveling and do well when left alone in a strange place. Pierson had his no-bark collar on. I also put a do not disturb sign on my door so the cleaning staff would not enter.

Petz on Board Emergency Contact for Pet Travel

PACKING
I won’t tell you everything I packed for myself, but I will tell you I made sure I had plenty of food and drink for the road trip so that I wouldn’t have to run into a convenience store and leave my dogs alone in the car. For Maya and Pierson, I packed enough dog food for two nights, water, their food and water dishes, leashes, dog car harnesses, vet records, pet first aid kit, Petz on Board sign with emergency contact info, dog beds, poo bags, treats, and the Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat.

TRAVELING
I opted to take my husband’s car instead of mine. My car is a 1998 model and has been salvaged twice so I don’t want to drive it that far if I don’t have to. I covered the entire back seat of my husband’s car with a sheet and set up the Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat. I also connected the tethers of their dog car harnesses to the seat belt housings. Maya wore the Kurgo Go-Tech and Pierson wore the Ruff Rider Roadie. (Maya usually wears the ClickIt Utility dog seat belt, but it is so restrictive I didn’t want to use this one for such a long journey.)

> Calming and Preventing Car Sickness
About 20 minutes before the trip, I applied Travel Calm from Earth Heart to both Maya and Pierson. Maya needs it because she is so excited in the car and drives me nuts with her happy whining. Pierson sometimes gets car sick and Travel Calm also helps with this.

Both dogs did very well on the drive to Wichita, but Maya was a pesty-poo on the way back home. I’m not sure if she was uncomfortable or what, but the Travel Calm did not work this time. She whined so much that I made several stops thinking perhaps she had to go to the bathroom. She didn’t. In any case, it took much longer for us to get home.

> Don’t Leave Dogs Alone in the Car
I didn’t have to stop for a restroom on the drive to our destination, but I had to stop for myself on the drive back. I hated to leave my dogs in the car, but I had no choice. Pets are not allowed in public restrooms, period. Luckily, I pulled up next to some nice ladies and asked if they could keep a short eye out for my pups. They were happy to oblige. I wouldn’t always trust this tactic, but you gotta do what you gotta do and I like to think that most people are relatively trustworthy.

Have you taken any recent road trips with your dogs? Please leave a comment below. If you’d like to do a guest post on your pet travels, email me. :)

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September 2, 2014

ClickIt Sport Dog Car Harness on Dogs

When the ClickIt Utility came out in the fall of 2013, it was rated as the safest dog car harness by the non-profit organization, The Center for Pet Safety (CPS). It is a fantastic seat belt that helps keep your dog very secure in the car. But since it is a brand new design, it has a few drawbacks. One, it is difficult to size and adjust. Two, it is a little bulky for smaller dogs. The company that designed the ClickIt Utility has listened to our feedback and designed the new ClickIt Sport.

LIGHT WEIGHT
The ClickIt Utility dog car harness is heavier and bulkier, which makes it less than ideal for some dogs. The ClickIt Sport promises to be lighter in weight but still have the same safety durability.

EASIER TO USE
The ClickIt Sport still has three points of contact and so will still be very restrictive. However, it is easier to connect these three points on the ClickIt Sport than it is on the ClickIt Utility. It no longer requires the latchbar connections so it can be used in older cars.

EASIER FIT
The sizing is more adjustable, allowing it to fit a larger range of dog shapes and sizes.

CPS CERTIFIED
Not only did Sleepypod, the company that designed the ClickIt Sport, crash test this pet travel product themselves, they also had it tested by an independent nonprofit organization called The Center for Pet Safety (CPS). If you recall, CPS did an extensive crash test study on 11 dog seat belts in 2013. They have since streamlined their studies and offer a CPS certification to any company who wants their dog seat belts tested. This is a voluntary service and the tests are rigorous. As of the date of this post, the ClickIt Sport is the only dog car harness to have received the CPS Certification.

ADDITIONAL FEATURES
A new infinity loop design (patent pending) reduces the pressure on a dog in a car accident and eliminates the need for metal hardware. It is now easier to attach a leash to the ClickIt Sport for walking. And the harness now has added reflector strips.

COMING THIS FALL
We don’t yet know when in fall the ClickIt Sport will be available, but we are staying on top of it and hope to have them in no more than a week after Sleepypod releases them. So stay tuned!

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August 28, 2014

Maya 7th Birthday No Rain

Maya just turned 7!  Except for the rain, she’s pretty happy about it. Seven years and still a puppy. :)

She’s been promoting safety for dogs in the car with dog travel gear since 2007.  Her birthday wish is that all doggies travel safely. And she wants you to use discount code, dogbirthday, on PetAutoSafety.com.

Safe Travels!!!

(Please note, the discount code does not apply to some products. It does apply to all seat belts and most travel carriers.)

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August 26, 2014

Since I have big dogs, traveling in the car can be a little uncomfortable for them. Maya likes to stand up when she rides in the car. So even with her dog car harness on, she had a difficult time keeping her front paws on the edge of the seat. If I stopped too fast, she’d slip and her front paws would end up on the floor. If I ever had to make an emergency stop, she could have been hurt. So how did I solve this problem while at the same time giving my big dogs more room to stretch on out long road trips? I’ve done it with seat extenders like the Backseat Bridge, Pet Dek, or Portable Pet Flat Seat.

The Backseat Bridge from Kurgo has been around for a while. I’ve always loved it, and still do. Then the Pet Dek came along and I fell in love all over again. It solved some of the issues with the Bridge. But now there is the Portable Pet Flat Seat. How is one to decide which one is best for them and their dog? Here are some comparisons:

The Car Pet Dek with Dogs Maya & Pierson

I rate the Pet Dek as the easiest to install in the car.

 

Installation
The Portable Pet Flat Seat was so easy to install, I didn’t even have to read the instructions! While the Pet Dek was easy too, I did have a problem with one of the legs that kept coming off. I was able to fix it, but if I hadn’t been handy I might have requested the product be replaced. I probably just had bad luck. If this one had not had this trouble, the Pet Dek would have been very simple to put in the car. The Backseat Bridge has four wrap-around straps, making it just a tad bit more work to set up in the car. Rating installation, I’d say the Pet Dek is #1 for the easiest. The Flat Seat is #2. And the Bridge is #3.

Pierson in the Car Backseat Bridge

I rate the Backseat Bridge as the least bulky of the three seat extenders.

Bulkiness
Both the Flat Seat and the Pet Dek can be a little heavy as compared to the Bridge. I’m not sure of the exact weight but if you are a small petite person, the Flat Seat and Pet Dek can be slightly cumbersome. Also, the Bridge folds up nice and small while the Pet Dek only folds in half and the Flat Seat doesn’t fold at all. So for bulkiness, the Bridge is less bulky and I rate it as #1. The Pet Dek is #2. And the Flat Seat is #3.

Dog Pierson on Pet Travel Flat Seat in Car 2

I rate the Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat as the flattest seat with the fewest gaps.

Flatness & Gaps
Unless the back seat is completely flat, the bridge leaves a bit of a lip that my dogs Maya and Pierson didn’t care for. Although they had more room to stretch out, this lip could be a challenge. Neither the Pet Dek nor the Flat Seat has a lip. They are completely flat. Regarding gaps, however, the Bridge had minimal gaps. But because the Pet Dek is one size only, there tended to be a gap between it and both the front and back seats. I solved this problem by putting stuff between the gaps. You may be able to see it in the photo. Because the Flat Seat is so thin, the gaps are extremely minimal. Rating flatness, I put the Portable Pet Flat Seat at #1, the Pet Dek at #2, and the Bridge at #3. Rating gaps, I put the Flat Seat at #1, the Bridge at #2, and the Pet Dek at #3. By the way, with the Bridge and Flat Seat the front seats have to be even. You can’t have one seat further back than the other. This is not the case with the Pet Dek.

Cost
The Backseat Bridge is the least expensive. That is because it is manufactured by a large company (Kurgo) that makes a number of pet products. This allows them to be very cost effective. They even provide a lifetime guarantee and have a great repair and replacement policy to cover normal wear and tear or any other damage your dog might do. Both the Pet Dek and the Portable Pet Flat Seat don’t have these features. They are designed by individual entrepreneurs who only have this one product and are considered small family run businesses. Another thing that makes them more expensive is they are made here in the USA. So in rating costs, the Bridge is #1, the Pet Dek is #2, and the Flat Seat is #3. If you’re all about supporting small US businesses, then the Pet Dek and Flat seat are both #1.

Using Dog Seat Belts
There is no rating on which of these three pet travel products are best when it comes to being able to use your dog seat belt. All three allow for the use of seat belts. However, I will say that as a company both the Bridge and the Flat Seat actively promote buckling up your dog.

No single one of these pet travel seat extenders rated #1 in everything. So consider which features are most important to you. While I love all three of these products, I’ve decided that I like the Portable Pet Flat Seat the most. I think my dogs Maya and Pierson do too.

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