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Archive for the 'Pet Safety (General)' Category

January 6, 2014

 

Maya ClickIt Utility Pet Seat Belt

For Maya, safety means having to sit still in the car, not being able to puther head out the window, and wearing a seat belt. But she’s still happy despite her lack of freedom in the car.

Welcome to 2014! A new year means getting a fresh start. It means resolving to do what you’ve been putting off. You and your dog are going to get fit, you’re going to eat better, and you’re going to do more fun activities together. When making all these resolutions, don’t forget to include the safety of your best furry friend.

Use a Pet Travel Safety Device
You know, I can’t mention pet safety without mentioning dog seat belts or pet travel carriers. If your dog rides in the car, it is a good idea to make sure he rides safe. If he won’t wear a car harness or ride in a crate, at least consider covering the floor of the back seat or putting up a barrier to separate the front and the back of the vehicle. The Backseat Bridge is a great way to do both. By putting this in your car, you can help keep your dog from getting thrown onto the floor or into the front seat. The barrier might even keep him from trying to climb in the front.

Pierson in the Car Logo

The Backseat Bridge covers the floor of the car and has a divider blocking the center console.

Don’t Leave Your Pet in the Car
Resolve to never go anywhere with your dog where you have to leave him alone in the car. In spring and summer, you have to worry about the vehicle trapping heat. In the fall and winter, you have to worry about the car acting as a freezer. Plus, there is a danger of theft. And don’t even tell me about the sorts of people who hate animals and like to maliciously tease them.

Keep Head and Paws Inside the Vehicle
Also, make sure when your pet rides in the car that he doesn’t put his head or paws out the window. If you have to stop or swerve suddenly, your dog could choke or get thrown out of the vehicle. It’s happened, people. It really has. Flying road debris could also hurt your best friend’s eyes or nose. Not only are there small pebbles to worry about, but also trash that people toss out their windows.

Pierson Breeze Guard Car Window Screens

Pierson can’t put his head out the window because it is fitted with the Breeze Guard car window screens. I love these screens! I can put the window down and still keep my dogs safe. Click Pierson’s photo to find out more.

Don’t Ride in the Back of a Pickup
And for goodness sake, don’t let your dog ride in the back of a pickup. This is becoming illegal in more and more places. And for a very good reason.

Wear a Dog Life Jacket
Besides protection in cars, there are other safety things to consider for your pet. If your dog likes to swim or ride in a boat, make sure he wears a safety vest. Even though my Maya can swim, I generally have her wear a life jacket when she swims in a lake. This is because she loves swimming so much that I worry about her swimming too far after a stick or a ball. I worry about her getting too tired in the water.

Maya and her dog life jacket.

Maya wears her dog life jacket when she goes swimming at Clinton Lake.

Protect From Weather
Keep your dog safe then they are outdoors in adverse weather. Adverse weather includes rain, sleet, snow, and even the sun. If your dog spends a lot of time outdoors, make sure he has shelter. Shelter can help protect him against all sorts of weather. Always make sure he has fresh water. This is vital, but even more so in the heat. Protect paws from hot pavements and icy sidewalks, have short-coated dogs wear coats or sunscreen, and if hiking in nature watch out for wild animals and insects.

Wear a Lighted Collar
If you walk your dog at night, be sure your dog wears a lighted collar or reflective safety vest. If not your dog, at least yourself. Well, don’t wear a collar but at least carry some sort of light with you. You may see a car coming because of their headlights, but they can’t always see you.

Light Dog Collars 2

Pierson wears a light collar that dangles from his neck. Because his hair is so long, he can’t wear the glow collar that Maya is wearing.

Get Safe Chew Toys
If your dog is a chewer, resolve to find more dog toys that are indestructible. Resolve to supervise your dog whenever he plays with certain toys. Keep things that are unsafe to chew or eat out of his reach.

Pierson Kong Flyer Spring 2013 018

Pierson loves the indestructible Kong Flyer dog toy.

There are a lot of other pet safety things to consider, but I can hardly think of them all. Besides, pet car safety is my specialty. :)

What do you do to protect your best friend’s safety?

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Holiday Tips from Other Bloggers

Author: MayaAndPierson
December 23, 2013
Sephi and Maya with Antlers

Sephi & Maya 2010

Every year we have a dozen holiday tips for pets to share. But since every pet blogger seems to be doing the exact same thing, we thought we’d share their tips with you. After all, how can we possibly top these other great posts?

Fidose of Reality has some great dog travel tips Dog Travel Dos and Don’ts

They also have some great tips on how to make sure holiday visits are comfortable and safe for your pet 8 Ways to Help Your Dog Survive Holiday Visits

My Brown Newfies talks about how to protect your dog’s paws in winter Keeping Pawtstic Paws Protected in Winter

My Dog Pierson's Fuzzy Paw

Check your dog’s paws for ice or other debris.

That Mutt talks about giving cats as Christmas presents

And Wag the Dog reminds us of some holiday pet hazards Top 5 Holiday Pet Hazards

Maya Playing with Killer's Dog Toy

Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree with a stuffed monkey dog toy.

What are your holiday traditions and how do you make sure the holidays are both fun and safe for your furry friends?

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September 21, 2013

Some of you may have heard of this already, but if you see a dog with a yellow ribbon on their leash, it means the dog needs his space and you should not approach him. A dog can need extra space for a variety of reasons. Perhaps he is shy, is frightened of certain people or young children, just had surgery, has a tendency to snap, is working on obedience, or has leash reactive issues.

Yellow Ribbon Infographic

I only just recently heard of using a yellow ribbon for such dogs and can’t believe I haven’t heard of it before. Most people who read my personal blog know that my dog Pierson has leash reactive issues. He does not do well when he sees other dogs. A yellow ribbon might be a useful tool if more people knew what it meant.

If I am walking Pierson and we come across someone else walking their dog, I cross the street and I divert his attention with the “look” command and a treat in hopes that he will learn to associate seeing the other dog with good stuff.

Pierson on Leash Look Command

I also take Pierson on group walks where everyone in the group has a dog with a similar problem and we have all agreed to certain rules regarding our dogs’ interactions. While we walk together as a group, we walk spaced apart to whatever our own dog’s threshold level is. In Pierson’s case, he has to be at the end of the line. At first he had to be several yards behind but over time he has been able to get within a few feet of the dog in front.

Pierson Group Dog Walk

Look how close Pierson is able to get to other dogs now that we’ve been working with this dog walking group.

But what about cases where another person still let’s their dog approach Pierson? This has happened to me a few times. In two of the situations, the other dogs were not on leashes. In one situation, the person did not understand why I was crossing the street away from her and her dog and she really wanted to meet Pierson.

If more people knew about the yellow ribbons, perhaps the yellow ribbon could have given them advance notice. Some people are concerned about the negative view a yellow caution ribbon might mean. But if we help people understand it could be for a variety of reasons, not just aggression, I think it is a good idea. What do you think?

Keep in mind, however, that the yellow ribbon should not be used as an excuse to not do proper training. Pierson’s issue is being worked with and it will be much easier for me to alleviate his leash reactive behavior if I have complete control over who does and who doesn’t approach him. Another thing the yellow ribbon should not be used for is as a waiver of liability. If Pierson has a yellow ribbon on his leash and he still ends up hurting another dog, I am still liable.

The top infographic was found on http://gulahund.se/. Incidentally, gulahund means yellow dog in Swedish.

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August 17, 2013
Kurgo Wander Back Pack for Dogs

Maya sometimes wears her Kurgo Wander back pack for dogs when she goes hiking.

I don’t know about you, but I tend to be relatively inactive in the summer because it is so darned hot. I still take the dogs out for walks in the morning or evenings, but nature hikes are no fun in the summer. So now that the weather is getting cooler, I’m excited about taking the dogs on an outdoor hiking expedition again.

Here are some outdoor hiking safety factors I think about for Maya and Pierson:

Leashes or Harnesses

I admit, I don’t always keep Maya on a leash when we hike. Maya is very good at staying by my side and has a very good recall. Pierson, on the other hand, has never been off leash except in our backyard. So I don’t trust him to come when he is called if he sees an animal to chase. Know your dogs. If you are not sure if they will come to you in various scenarios, then keep them on a leash. Also, be considerate to other people when hiking in areas frequented by others. Some people don’t like dogs and are even afraid of them. Furthermore, some hiking trails are also frequented by bicyclists or people riding horses. Loose dogs do not always get along well with bicycles and horses.

Dog Tags

Maya and Pierson always wear their collar and tags. Plus, they are both microchipped. Even though I am confident in Maya’s recall and that I have a good grip on Pierson’s leash, the unexpected could happen. What if there is a loud noise that scares them? It might catch me unawares and make me lose my grip on their leash when they bolt. It’s unlikely but if the worst does happen, at least you have a better chance of being reunited with your best friend.

Wild Animals

Beware of wild animals. Small animals like rabbits and squirrels can be very tempting for your dog to chase. Your dog getting lost because he chased an animal is not the only concern. There are many harmful wild animals to watch out for such as alligators (BrownDogCBR has to look out for these), porcupines, poisonous snakes, skunks, raccoons, etc. By the way, another good reason to keep your dog on a leash is so that they don’t eat wild animal feces. Raccoon poop, for one, can be infected with worms or even canine distemper.

Plants & Biting Insects Harmful to Dogs

Some plants can be harmful for your dog too. Look out for poison ivy and poison oak. Also beware of thorned plants. Biting insects are what bothers me the most on our outdoor hiking adventures. Ticks here are really bad. We also need to be aware of mosquitos and fleas. My dogs use Frontline, but this only kills fleas and ticks when they get on the dog. It doesn’t prevent the little blood-suckers from getting on them in the first place. As a repellant, I am considering a new product from Earth Heart called Buzz Guard. Earth Heart is the same company that makes the Travel Calm that I use for Maya when she rides in the car.

Pet Water Safety – To Swim

If you are hiking near water and plan on letting your dog swim, consider a dog life jacket. Also, know the dangerous aquatic wild animals native to your area such as water moccasin snakes or alligators.

Maya and her dog life jacket.

Maya at Clinton Lake wearing her dog life jacket.

Pet Water Safety – To Drink

Water safety also includes making sure both you and your dog have plenty of fresh cool water to drink. If you can help it, don’t let your dog drink from the lake or river water. It can contain bacteria and parasites that will make your dog sick. I like using the Kurgo collapsible dog water bowl when I go hiking with the dogs. We also won the Frosty Paws travel pack sometime back and it has a fantastic dog water bottle.

Dog Pierson Collapsible Dog Bowl

My dog Pierson is drinking from the Kurgo collapsible dog bowl.

Dog Travel Safety

Don’t forget to travel to your hiking destination in safety. Seat belts for dogs, pet travel carriers, or our new K9 Car Fence, are just a few of the options available to ensure your best friend is kept just as safe as every other member of your family.

Conclusion

I like to take Maya and Pierson to Clinton Lake. The Mutt Run off-leash dog park is nearby and even has a place for Maya to swim. And there are a lot of secluded trails around the lake for me to take my dog-aggressive fluffhead Pierson.

Maya Meets Dog Swimming @ Dog Park

This is one of the rivers that feed into Clinton Lake. This particular area is part of the Mutt Run off-leash dog park.

 

I hope I covered everything. Can you think of any other outdoor hiking safety tips? Where do you like to take your dog hiking?

 

Update – First Aid Kit

After reading another blog post on first aid supplies, I realized I didn’t have a first aid kit on my list. Shame, shame! It is a good idea to have one with supplies for both you and your pet when you go hiking. A complete list of ideal first aid supplies can be found on KeepTheTailWagging.com. Thanks Kimberly, for your great post and reminder. :)

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July 20, 2013
Dog Sitting Nicely

D a r n  it! I wish I had taken a photo earlier this week of Maya & Pierson sitting nicely when we had guests over.

We had someone from AT&T over the other day to see if they could fix our internet. We were told that our dogs had to be confined while they were here. Why? The AT&T guy that came told me one of his coworkers had recently been bitten in the face by a dog that was supposed to be friendly. Maybe the dog was. But dogs will be dogs. Maya will jump up on people if I am not careful. This can be very dangerous if someone is bending over when they pet her.

So no matter how friendly your dog is, be considerate of your guests. I have a tendency to think, “The dogs live here, you don’t.” But what if Maya jumps on someone and hurts them? It would be my fault. I would be responsible. It doesn’t matter whose house it is. So in order to protect the safety of my guests, here is what I do with Maya and Pierson:

Work on Sit / Stay
Maya gets really excited when people come over. So we’ve been working very hard on the sit and stay commands. I don’t just work with her at home with no distractions, I also work with her when people come over and out in public with other distractions.

Work on No Jumping
I’ve taught Maya not to jump on me, but it has been difficult to keep her from jumping on other people. People don’t know that they shouldn’t pet her unless she is sitting calmly, so it is my responsibility to tell them. When we are at home or on walks and someone wants to pet Maya, I make sure they know that if she gets up or starts to get anxious, back away or turn around and ignore her.

Keep on a Lead
This helps even at home. If Maya is on a leash when guests come over, it helps put her in “work” mode. It also enables me to grab the other end and restrain her if she gets too excited.

Make Sure Pets are Confined
Yes, it is my house. But there will be some cases where it is simply best to confine my dogs. The AT&T guy was just one example. Another situation I have to be careful of because of Maya’s exuberance is when small children come over. Maya is great with kids, but she tends to get so excited that she knocks them over.

What do your dogs do when people come over? Are they challenging like Maya or calm and well-mannered like Pierson? (Sephi was well-mannered too.)

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June 15, 2013

Fireworks

It is almost celebration time, and that means fireworks. I love fireworks. They are beautiful and fun. It’s great being able to get together with family to enjoy this spectacular event. For me, family includes my dogs Maya & Pierson. But this is one family event where they are not allowed.

Last year, a friend of ours found a dog that had run off from her owner’s yard because the neighbors were shooting fireworks. Her name was Shiera and she was lucky. She had run a long distance and crossed many streets in her haste to get away from the frightening noises of fireworks. Luckily, she didn’t get hit by a car. And thankfully, she found my friend who enlisted my help.

Shiera was not wearing any identification so we had no way of knowing where she belonged. The next morning I had her scanned for a microchip and found nothing. Thankfully, Shiera’s owner and I found each other through our posts on Craig’s List. You can read the full story HERE.

Shiera’s owner learned a valuable lesson about fireworks. Shiera’s fate could have been far worse. So to keep this from happening to you and your best friend, we suggest the following pet safety tips:

- Before the fireworks start, take your dog for a long walk to tire him out and let him do his business.

- Leave your dog at home, inside, and in a secure place. A secure place can be his dog crate or a room.

- Even if indoors, make sure your dog is wearing his tags. I’ve heard of dogs breaking out screens or even glass windows in order to get out and away.

- Turn on something loud to disguise the noise. Consider calming music like “Through a Dog’s Ear”. My dog Sephi liked to hide in the bathroom so I would turn on the fan in order to help cover the noise.

- If you are home, play with your dog while fireworks going on. This may help your dog associate fun with the noise.

- Talk to your veterinarian about a dog anxiety treatment.

Pierson wearing Thundershirt for Dogs

Pierson wearing his Thundershirt.

Nothing will ruin the fun festivities of fireworks more than losing your best friend because of them. The above tips are simple things you can do to help your dog feel more comfortable and safe. So practice pet safety and go have some worry-free fun!

What do you do for your dog during these celebrations? We stay home. Maya, being a Lab, isn’t concerned about loud noises. Pierson barks, but he seems to take his cue from Maya that there is nothing to be concerned about. I will probably have him wear his Thundershirt.

 

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June 1, 2013
Dog Bailey Got in Trash

A customer shared this photo of her dog Bailey. Notice that Bailey has a banana sticker on his eye.

I am lucky in that my dogs Maya & Pierson don’t get into the trash. I don’t think it has ever occurred to them. My dog Sephi used to, but it did take some training and preventative measures. Not only is it annoying to have to clean up a trash mess, but there are all sorts of dangers to worry about. And it is a common problem. Look over these dangers, and then consider some pet safety training and prevention techniques.

DANGERS

Head Stuck – This one can be more funny than dangerous… funny for you but not your dog. Check out this hilarious video:

Tummy Ache – At the very least, your dog will get a tummy ache from the trash he ate.

Poison – Some foods are poisonous to dogs. Chocolate, for example, although who would put some perfectly good chocolate in the trash. Onions are not good for dogs either. Here is a larger list at HSUS. Food poisoning can also include salmonella. I sometimes take the skin off chicken before I bake it. If I throw that skin in the trash and my dogs get into it a day or so later, they are in great danger of getting salmonella poisoning. Salmonella poisoning can be deadly. And food poisoning is not the only danger. Have you ever thrown away an empty bottle of cleaner? Perhaps it wasn’t completely empty and there was some residue left over.

Gastrointestinal Obstruction – Also consider the danger of gastrointestinal blockage. This can happen from your dog eating bones, aluminum foil, corn on the cob, or other things that your dog’s stomach can’t digest. Gastrointestinal obstruction can cause your dog great distress and can even lead to death. Read more at PetMD.

SAFETY AND PREVENTION

The best way to keep your dogs out of the trash is to prevent them from getting into the trash in the first place. If you have a pantry where the door can close, put your trash can in there. If not, perhaps you can use a small trash can in the kitchen and put it under the kitchen sink. Put baby guards on the cupboard door too. If neither of those places are convenient for you, get a trash can with a lid. A lid that opens when you step on a pedal might work better than a lid where you push open (as evidenced in the above video).

DOG TRAINING

Prevention may not always be easy. Sometimes there is just no good place to put your trash can and perhaps your dog is smart enough to open any trash can lid. Another alternative is to try training. This may not be easy to do and it is not foolproof, but anything you can do to keep your dog out of the trash benefits both you and your best friend.

Control the situation by leaving tempting but not dangerous items in the trash. Leave the room and listen closely. If you hear your dog trying to get in the trash, come out and say, “No!” in a firm voice. You must catch your dog in the act for this to work. It does little good to tell your dog no before or after the incident.

Does your dog get into the trash? Do you think any of these ideas will help? Does anyone have any other ideas to keep your dog out of the trash?

Thank you for your comments and thanks for stopping by for Pet Safety Saturday! :)

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Cooling Dog Collar - Pink

Maya Wearing a Cooling Dog Collar

I love playing outside with my dogs, Maya and Pierson. And my dogs enjoy being outside. But the weather is warming up amazingly fast so I need to be aware of the effect that heat may have on my dogs. After doing a little research, here are some things I’ve found to help my dogs with pet safety under the sun.

PREVENTION
The best way to avoid heat exhaustion or a heat stroke is to take preventative action.

* Don’t leave your dog in the car!
* Don’t leave your dog outside without shade and cool water.
* Be careful about overdoing the play, walks, and runs.
* Take cool-down breaks.
* Avoid concrete. Dark pavements get very hot.
* Use a cooling harness, cooling dog collar, or a cooling mat.
* Make sure your dog is able to pant (no muzzles).

SYMPTOMS
Sometimes we get so carried away with our fun, we may not be aware that heat exhaustion is coming on. Here are some things to look out for:

* Excessive and/or heavy panting.
* Excessive drool.
* Bright red tongue.
* Lack of coordination, disorientation, and/or unable to stand.
* Vomiting.
* Diarrhea.

The above symptoms are the beginning stages of heat exhaustion. If left unnoticed or disregarded, the symptoms could progress into a deadly heat stroke. Your dog could collapse and go into shock or have seizures. Get them to the veterinarian immediately.

TREATMENT
For mild symptoms, get your dog cooled down by trying some of the following methods.

* Move inside to the a/c.
* Move your dog to the shade.
* Allow your dog to lie down in cool water (not ice water).
* Hose your dog down in cool water.
* Put your wet dog in front of a fan.
* Put cool water on his feet.
* Allow him to drink cool water; or if he won’t, put cool water on his tongue.
* Give him ice cubes to lick.
* Put ice packs on his groin area.

If the symptoms of heat exhaustion do not go away within 10 minutes or so, take them to the veterinarian.  You may even want to call your veterinarian while you are trying to cool your dog down. Your vet can give you more ideas and can advise you on whether you need to bring your dog in.

Remember, prevention is the best remedy. Be aware of the signs so that you can treat your dog before the symptoms get deadly. And be aware when you see other dogs. Someone else at the park may not know to look out for heat exhaustion in their dog and may miss the signs. You could help prevent a disaster.

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May 4, 2013
"I have idiopathic epilepsy (canine epilepsy) and I am still a happy healthy boy... And cute, too."

“I have idiopathic epilepsy (canine epilepsy) and I am still a happy healthy boy… And cute, too.”

If you read yesterday’s post, you know my Aussie mix dog Pierson has recently had another seizure. No worries, though. He is fine. Most dogs that have problems with seizures have what is called idiopathic epilepsy. This sounds terrible, and it can be for a few. But in most cases, it is mild enough and infrequent enough that medication is not even needed. Most dogs with canine epilepsy live long healthy lives.

I’ve never had a dog with seizures before Pierson. But thanks to the internet and all my dog blog friends, I’ve known about canine epilepsy for some time. Because I had foreknowledge, I was able to remain calm when Pierson had his first episode in January. So that you can have foreknowledge too, read through the following facts:

What Can Cause a Seizure in Dogs:

* Brain injury
* Distemper
* Heat stroke
* Vaccines
* Brain tumor
* Poisoning
* Kidney or liver failure
* Low blood sugar
** All these sound scary. But the most common reason for a seizure is idiopathic epilepsy. Idiopathic epilepsy is caused by none of the above. In fact, the cause is not known at all. Veterinarians generally label a dog with seizures as having idiopathic epilepsy when all of the above possible causes for the seizure have been eliminated.

While it may seem frustrating to not know what is causing your dog’s seizure, at least with a diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy you will know your dog wasn’t poisoned and that he doesn’t have a brain injury. It may also help to know that it is unlikely your dog feels any pain while seizing.

What To Do If Your Dog is having a Seizure:

* Move stuff out of the way so your dog doesn’t hurt themselves on something.
* Don’t put anything in your dog’s mouth.
* Try not to touch your dog while he is seizing.
* Remain calm.
* Call your veterinarian.
* Go to the vet after you have called them. Don’t talk on your phone while driving and remember to drive safe.

To read about Pierson’s first seizure, check out this article of Pierson’s Seizure on my American Dog Blog. Click the links in that article for more detailed information about canine epilepsy.

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April 27, 2013
Maya by Tulips

My dog Maya stole tomatoes out of our garden last year. Thank goodness she doesn’t like to eat tulips.

Last year, Maya stole a lot of cherry tomatoes from the garden. I thought it was funny. But later I found out that tomatoes can be bad for dogs. Too much tomato and it could actually be toxic. So this year, we are going to be a bit more careful about our garden. Here are some things to think about:

Cocoa Mulch
If you have dogs, don’t use cocoa mulch in your flower garden. Cocoa mulch contains a chemical in the cocoa called theobromine. This chemical is poisonous do dogs. And because the mulch smells so good, dogs want to eat it.

Pesticides
Before putting any pesticides in your garden, check the label to make sure it is not harmful to pets. Consider natural remedies such as non-toxic soapy water sprayed on your plants.

Fertilizer
As with pesticides, check the label of plant fertilizers to make sure it is not harmful to pets.

Plants that can Cause Allergic Reactions
There are several plants that can make dogs itch or have other allergic reactions. Some of these plants include the purple leaf velvet plant, a male juniper bush, and daylilies.

Plants Toxic to Dogs
The ASPCA has a very comprehensive list of toxic plants. It even has tomatoes on it. There are 392 entries so far. So rather than go through one by one, know what you want to plant and search the list for that specific plant - ASPCS Plants Toxic to Dogs

Compost
It’s no secret that dogs love garbage! Make sure your dogs can’t get into the compost. Even if you are careful about what you put in the compost pile, you really don’t want your dog to eat it. Make sure your compost is out of reach of your dogs.

Fleas and Ticks
Since we have wild rabbits living under our shed, it is likely that they carry fleas and ticks too. So I make sure my dogs are protected.

Put Tools Away
Keep your tools put away so your dog can’t get to them. Not only do you not want them to step on them and cut themselves on sharp edges, but you also don’t want them to chew on them.

The easiest way to keep your dog out of your garden is to prevent him from being able to get into the garden in the first place. This year, I am having a fence put around our vegetable garden. Are you going to plant a flower or vegetable garden this year? What does your dog think about it?

 

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