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Archive for August, 2009

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Have you noticed that Sephi and Maya hasn’t posted anything in a while? That’s because we were moving our new headquarters. Pet Auto Safety.com with Nature by Dawn, Inc. is growing more and more every day so we needed more space. So what does this mean for you? It means we can keep more inventory which gives us more control over how our products are shipped to you. We here at Pet Auto Safety.com are more likely able to rush orders and we can offer alternate shipping methods, such as shipping to a P.O. box. Please note that larger items and all Hatchbag and Snoozer products will still be coming from the manufacturers. But just about everything else, such as our dog care seat belts and pet car seat covers, will be coming directly from our new location.

So where are we? Pet Auto Safety.com with Nature by Dawn, Inc. has moved a short distance from Overland Park, Kansas to Lawrence, Kansas. Lawrence is a nice middle-sized town and home of the Kansas University Jayhawks. If you have a return, the new address for Pet Auto Safety.com with Nature by Dawn, Inc. is 208 Sharon Dr. in Lawrence, Kansas 66049. If you need to call us, we can still be reached at our old number (913) 961-3015 for the next couple more months, but our new number (785) 393-2044 is available now.

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A Summer Safety Measure

Author: FidoIntheCar
August 19, 2009
A Summer Safety Measure

In the hot summertime, transporting dogs in a car can be a dangerous task. Even if you have the air conditioning on high, that cool air may not reach your dog in the backseat. It’s not very safe to have your dog in the front seat unless you have the proper dog restraints, so what’s the solution to keeping your dog cool? It’s an innovative car product called Kozy Kennel that’s made especially for dogs.

Kozy Kennel easily installs to a vehicle’s air conditioning vent and directs cool air into dog crates, camper shells, pet barriers or police K-9 enclosures. It’s actually used by K-9 units to keep dogs cool in the back of police cars. A study done by a K-9 unit found that Kozy Kennel keeps the rear area of a police car about 10 to 12 degrees cooler than it would be without Kozy Kennel. It can also direct warm air to keep your dog warm in the cooler months, and it can easily dry off a wet dog. However, remember that even Kozy Kennel will not keep your dogs safe if you leave them in a hot or cold car unattended! In early July, two British police dogs died whFen they were left in a hot car at police headquarters in Nottingham. Don’t let your dog get overheated, or worse!

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A Safety Essential

Author: FidoIntheCar
August 5, 2009
A Safety Essential

Would you let your child ride in the car without wearing a seatbelt? Of course not! So why would you let your dog ride around without any safety measures to keep him safe? Just like you need to buy car seats and boosters for children under a certain age, you need to find a car harness made especially for dogs to keep your pooch safe. They come in all sizes, so be sure to choose one that fits your dog comfortably but snugly.

Tru-Fit makes a great Smart Harness that is extremely easy to use. It’s easy to put on your dog, and the metal hardware is designed to hold up to 2,000 pounds. It has a broad, padded chest plate for extra protection and comfort, and it has a secure loop that works with any vehicle seatbelt system. The added benefits of using a dog car harness are that your dog won’t be roaming around the car and distracting you while you drive, and he won’t accidentally fall out the window if he gets overly curious and daring.

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When you travel, you have an emergency first aid kit for yourself, but what about one for your dog?

First and foremost, when traveling with your dog this summer, be sure your dog has access to plenty of water. Also be sure to keep the phone number of your dog’s veterinarian and a 24 hour number to a pet emergency hospital.

The other contents of an emergency dog first aid kit are similar to that of an emergency first aid kit for people. Your emergency dog first aid kit will need bandages, gauze, adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, and tweezers. The emergency dog first aid kit will also need, sterile saline for the eyes (contact lens solution), latex gloves, and a blanket (especially when travelling in cold weather).

An additional item your emergency dog first aid kit will need, which is not needed in an emergency first aid kit for people, is a nylon leash. Oftentimes when a dog is injured, they will not want you to touch them. In order to help them, you may need the nylon leash to wrap around your dog’s muzzle and to restrain the dog while you tend to them.

Never give your dog Tylenol, aspirin, Advil, or any other medication without first checking with your veterinarian. Before you go traveling with your dog, you may want to ask your veterinarian what sort of emergency medications you can keep in your emergency dog first aid kit. When traveling with your dog, it is always best to be prepared.

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