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Archive for September, 2009

September 29, 2009

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Maya Still Playing Outdoors in Winter

Summer is over but your sporting dog is still going to need exercise. Fall is the time when the sporting dog goes hunting with their people. But not all people go hunting so not every sporting dog gets to hunt. So take him out to the park instead. It’s a great time of year to play fetch. The sporting dog loves to fetch in a field and in the water. Since the weather is cooler, the water will be cooler too, but the sporting dog probably won’t even notice. Play fetch with a Frisbee, ball, Kong, rope toy, plush toy… you get the idea. Try a fun game of keep away but make sure the game is fun for your dog, not an aggravation. Another fun game for your sporting dog is hide-and-seek. If there are two people, one can hold the dog while the other goes to hide. Hide behind a tree, in a tree, behind the shed, in the shed, under the patio… just like when you were a kid. Then the other person lets the dog go and encourages him to find you. Some sporting dog breeds are bred for search-and-rescue so this is a great game. Don’t you wish you enjoyed your work as much as the sporting dog does? Hide-the-treat is another great game for your sporting dog. It’s not as active as the other games but it can be just as challenging and fun.

Have a great fall season with your sporting dog. To learn more about sporting dogs, click here:  The Sporting Dog Group.  For a cool sporting dog figurines, click here:  Sporting Dog Figurines

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Sandi Wearing Her Pet Travel Seat Belt

Here is an excerpt from an article which provides great information about the wonderful Shih Tzu dog breed:

“It is a strange name but a Shih Tzu is a very popular dog breed in the US today. Amazingly, the US never even heard of this dog breed before the 1930s because only the members of the Chinese royal family were permitted to own them. “Shīzi Gǒu” in Chinese literally means “Lion Dog”. The Shih Tzu is a lap dog bred to resemble a lion. They have a long and silky coat which needs careful brushing at least every other day….

…The Shih Tzu dog was bred to be an indoor lap dog. And as such, they should not be left outdoors in extreme hot or cold weather. When you travel, you should take your Shih Tzu dog with you or leave them with a friend. The Shih Tzu dog breed generally does not like to be left alone and may get stressed out in a kennel environment. If you take your Shih Tzu dog with you they are perfectly happy travelers. Because they love people and they love to get attention, they may try to ride in your lap when you drive. This can be a distraction, and it can also be a danger. Consider getting your Shih Tzu dog a pet travel seat beltor a pet car seat. The Shih Tzu dog is small enough that you can also take them with you when you fly. An appropriately sized kennel and a health certificate form your veterinarian are two of the many things your Shih Tzu dog will need before they can go on an airplane.”

To read more on this article, visit “The Shih Tzu Dog Breed”

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An Awesome Job by RescueInk.org

Author: MayaAndPierson
September 23, 2009

Watching Good Morning America this morning, I just learned about this awesome group of biker men who not only rescue abused and neglected animals, but they also confront the offenders.  They have a show which is going to premier on the National Geographic Channel on Friday, September 25, 10pm EP. I checked out their Success Stories page and it brought tears to my eyes – tears of sadness that there are people in this world who actually treat animals this way – and tears of happiness that there are people in this world who really care and want to do something about it.

Check out this link on the success stories:  http://www.rescueink.org/success.html.

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September 17, 2009
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Generally speaking, dogs are crazy about car rides. They seem to have a true passion for the open road, as most of them will sit patiently and gaze out at the scenery without putting up a fuss. If the scenery pacifies them, the smells have the opposite effect. There are enough unfamiliar sights and smells along the highway that dogs can stay occupied for hours at a time.

A dog safety seat is especially advisable for two reasons. First, it protects the dog against the risk of stopping short; since they can’t wear a traditional seatbelt, dogs are susceptible to jarring turns and sudden stops in the car. Second, these safety seats are designed to restrain dogs so that they cannot impede the driver’s ability to operate a vehicle. Although it’s rare, some dogs like to wander around the car’s interior – a serious hazard to all concerned.

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The Skybox Booster Seat from Kurgo, which is available at Pet Auto Safety.com, was presented on the morning news show, Good Morning America. Chris Cuomo and Lady ( a cute Yorkie mix from the New York Humane Society) introduced Veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker. Dr. Marty Becker introduced a variety of pet products which help make pet travel safer, including the Skybox Booster Seat.

Click here to watch the segment about the Skybox Booster Seat on Good Morning America.

(No, that’s not Lady in the Skybox Booster Seat. It almost looks like it could be, doesn’t it?)

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September 13, 2009

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When I first saw Maya, she was only four months old and in need of a good home. She was so adorable and I had been wanting a second dog for some time, so I agreed to take her from her previous owner (who had only adopted Maya a week ago).

Since getting Maya was a rather in-the-moment thing, I was completely unprepared to take her home in my car. So I did the best I could to block her from getting from the back seat into the front seat. But Maya was determined to sit up front with me.

I was just a little over a block away from home and was coming upon an intersection with signal lights. Because I was trying to push Maya back into the back seat, I completely overlooked the fact that the lights were red. Thankfully, I only got honked at and did not get into or cause a car accident.

Needless to say, I ordered a dog car seat belt for her as soon as we got home. Maya has worn her dog car seat belt ever since. (Of course we had to buy a new one when she got bigger – See the photo above.  Yep, thats my Maya!)

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September 11, 2009

KSDS is sponsoring the Amanda’s Dog Festival at Porter Park in Prairie Village, Kansas at 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, September 13th. Pet Auto Safety.com and other pet vendors will be there as well. KSDS, Inc. is a non-profit organization who helps disabled people by providing trained canine assistance. The festival was started by Amanda and her friends. Amanda has cerebral palsy and has a dog who helps her do many things. Read more about Amanda and how the festival was started by clicking here.

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September 9, 2009

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Pet Auto Safety.com has recently added more wonderful pet auto safety products from Snoozer. Snoozer provides a variety of products, but Pet Auto Safety.com is especially interested in their pet travel safety seats. The pet travel safety seats from Snoozer are the most comfortable and of the highest quality of all our pet travel safety seats.

The pet travel safety seats from Snoozer include the Lookout and the Deluxe Lookout Pet Travel Safety Seats, the Console Pet Travel Safety Seats, and the Lookout Perch Pet Travel Safety Seats.

The colors of the Snoozer pet travel safety seats include black, grey, or khaki quilt; leopard quilt or highland maize; colonial, azure, blackwatch, or blue O’Donnell plaid’. Oh, yeah… don’t forget the vinyl colors of the pet travel safety seats – black, grey, khaki, pink, hot pink, or burgundy.

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September 8, 2009

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Pet Auto Safety.com is looking for more stories about dogs. Tell us about rescued dogs, doggie good deeds, dog survival stories, and especially about travel incidents with your dog. Have you been in a car accident with your dog? Did your dog have a bad airline experience? Have you seen a dog in the back of a pickup get thrown out? Did you have to stop suddenly with your dog unrestrained in the car? Did your dog distract the driver and almost cause a car accident?

Share your dog’s story! We’d prefer stories with happy endings. But if the story is tragic, maybe we can still share it and hope that it prevents tragedies in the future.

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It has come to our attention that the extra-small Houndstooth Dog Seat Belt Harness is sometimes too small for extra small dogs. The next size up is the small-medium Houndstooth Dog Seat Belt Harness, but these are usually too big. We have notified Cruising Companion, which is the manufacturer of these products, and we hope to have the size correction made soon. It is a simple matter of lengthening the girth strap.

Before you buy an extra-small Houndstooth Dog Seat Belt Harness, be sure to measure your dog’s girth (chest) size. If your dog’s girth size is more than 15″, the extra-small Houndstooth Dog Seat Belt Harness won’t fit. And unless your dog is 20″ or more in girth, the small-medium size will be too big. So, in other words, don’t get the Houndstooth Dog Seat Belt Harness if your dog has a girth between 15″ and 20″.

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