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Archive for August, 2010

August 29, 2010

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You see people traveling with a dog, but you probably don’t see people traveling with their cat.  Cats just don’t get to go to as many places as dogs.  The dog park or any park probably isn’t the best place to take your cat.  It would probably be scary for your cat to take him to the pet store.  And he probably wouldn’t ride well in the car anyway.

But there are times when a cat needs to travel in the car – like when going to the vet.  Or perhaps when you need to move and you don’t want to leave your cat behind.  But a cat left unrestrained can be more dangerous than a dog.  Cats are curious.  And they may want to investigate every part of the car, including under your feet where the brake and accelerator is.

So how can you keep your cat restrained in the car?  He probably won’t tolerate a dog seat belt.  And most dog seat belt harnesses won’t fit anyway.  But there is hope.  Consider a crate or enclosed pet car seat.  A crate can be strapped in with the Kennel Straps Car Restraint System for additional safety.  A pet car seat, like the Roll-Around Pet Carrier, can also be strapped in for safety.

If your cat is not used to a crate, it may be a bit stressful for him.  But it would be much safer for both him and you.  If you need to travel a long distance with your cat try practicing at home first.  Put him in a good-sized create for a few minutes several times a day, then increase the time as your cat becomes more comfortable.  Put his toys and favorite treats or food in there with him.  The sooner you start practicing at home, the sooner you can take your cat on trips with greater ease.

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August 27, 2010

 funny dog pictures-BORN TO BE WILD

Courtesy of IHasAHotDog.com

This is a cute photo of a dog riding in the car and having a good time.  He is partially safe because he is wearing goggles while sticking his head out the window.  But we here at Pet Auto Safety.com can’t help but to point out that he is not wearing a dog car safety harness.  He could fall out or he could still get hurt from flying debris while he is hanging out the window.  However, the photo is cute so we thought we would share it.

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August 25, 2010

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Maya, my yellow Labrador Retriever, just turned 3 years old today.  She is not just my dog, she is the model of one of the dog car seat belt brands.  She is also seen at the top of this blog page.  And she was used to design the Pet Auto Safety.com logo.  Maya is famous!

 In celebration of her 3rd birthday, we are sharing a 10% off discount code which can be used at any time on Pet Auto Safety.com.  The discount code is dogbirthday.  Enter it in all lower-case and as one word to get 10% off of anything at Pet Auto Safety.com.

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August 22, 2010

Recently two popular dog blogs posted articles about how dogs should be restrained when riding in the car.  Check out PawNation and Dogster.  PawNation mentions the Kurgo brand dog seat belts and the Bark Buckle Up website which promotes the PetBuckle brand dog seat belts.  Both brands of dog seat belts are great products and both are available at Pet Auto Safety.com. Check out both the PawNation post and the Dogster Post for great informative information.

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Pet Travel Etiquette

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 19, 2010

Maya

More and more people are traveling with their pets these days.  You see people and their dogs sightseeing, staying in hotels, or dining on outdoor patios of nice restaurants.  The trend is growing and so long as we practice common courtesy and safety when it comes to traveling with our pets, out pets may be allowed to visit more places.

Keep Other People In Mind
One important thing to remember when traveling with your dog is to keep in mind that not all people like dogs.  Some people are terrified of dogs.  And more still are allergic to dogs.  Be aware of your surroundings and steer clear of people who seem intimidated or wary of your dog.  And definitely stay away from those people who have an obvious look of distaste on their face.distaste on their face.

Keep Your Pet Under Control
Not only should your dog be on a leash at all times, but his leash should also be short.  While your dogs may be extremely cute and friendly, you want to keep them close to you.  One danger to a dog which is on a long lead or is not under proper control is that you could get violent reactions from people your dog gets too close to.  The violence could be on you or on your dog.  And sadly, the law may be on that person’s side.  Another danger is that your dog may pick up trash or other harmful items when you are not looking or before you can react.  The danger to people around dogs who are on a long lead include people tripping over the leash, getting tangling in the leash, having allergic reactions to your dog, your dog jumping on them, or your dog nipping, biting, or scratching them. scratching them.

Pick Up After Your Pet
Always pick up after your pet when you are in a public place.  Leaving dog feces in public places is unsanitary and probably illegal in most cities.  The last thing you want on your vacation is an expensive fine.  Also, despite popular belief, dog feces kills grass, it doesn’t fertilize it.  Dog poo is just as unsanitary in the grass as it is anywhere else.  Always keep dog poopie bags on hand so you don’t have to be too embarrassed when your dog takes a dump right in the middle of a public place for all to view.  Also, don’t allow your dog to hike his leg in public places.  Sometimes, especially when outside, your dog may be tempted to hike his leg on something he shouldn’t.ouldn’t.

Know Beforehand If Dogs Are Allowed
Don’t take your dog to any public places unless you know for certain that he is allowed.  While some restaurants with outdoor patios allow dogs, many more do not.  Some parks may only allow dogs in certain areas.  Some recreational areas may not allow dogs at all.  I went to an outdoor botanical garden once which did not allow dogs.  So just because a particular place you want to visit is outdoors, it does not mean that your dog will be allowed.  Be sure to call ahead before you visit.  This way, if they don’t allow dogs, you won’t be tempted to leave your dog in the car while you sightsee and you won’t have to take your dog back to the hotel.the hotel.We dog lovers would love to be able to take our dogs everywhere we go.  The only way society will learn to be more acceptable to this idea is if we act responsibly.  The more we can show the public that we will control our pets and be responsible pet owners, the more open society will come to be.  If you have any other ideas on how we can practice pet travel and public etiquette, please share your thoughts with us.

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August 16, 2010

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You may already be familiar with Outward Hound pet supply brands.  The Outward Hound brand provides products which combine quality with affordability.  Their products are well made and relatively inexpensive as compared to other brands.  Outward Hound makes dog backpacks, dog toys, water bowls, dog life vests, pet strollers, and more.  But did you know that they also make pet travel supplies too?

Pet Auto Safety.com provides a number of pet travel supplies with the Outward Hound brand.  Both the Kyjen Pet Booster Seat and the Outward Hound Pet Booster Seat are Outward Hound brands.  Both of these pet booster seat styles provide security for your dog when he travels in the car while at the same time giving him a “boost” so he can see out the window.

Other pet travel supplies from Outward Hound include the Front Seat Barrier which keeps your dog from climbing over the console to the front seat, the Window Bumper which provides padding for the dog who likes to put his head out the window, the Extend-A-Seat which covers the floor of the back seat to give your dog more room, and the Port-A-Bowl which is an easy carry food and water bowl for when you take your dog for long walks or long travel trips.

Check out these and other great pet travel supplies at Pet AutoSafety.com.  Feel free to use discount code, petblogger, to get 10% off your order.

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Tails on the Trails Pet Event

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 10, 2010

Come visit Pet Auto Safety.com (Nature by Dawn) and other fantastic pet vendors at the Tails on the Trails event in Lenexa, Kansas. On Saturday, August 14th from 9am to 2pm, the Lenexa Animal Control and Parks & Recreation is hosting a fun event for our doggie pals at Ad Astra Park & Swimming Pool, located at 83rd and Maurer.

Not only will there be great deals from the pet vendors, there will also be fun events for your dogs. Dogs will be allowed to swim in the pool for $8 per session. There will be a pet parade and pet show contests. On-site microchipping and pet vaccinations are available at a discounted price. The Tails on the Trails event will also have dog trainers, wildlife specialists, a dog agility demonstration, and animal adoptions.

Don’t miss this great event! For more information visit http://www.lenexa.ks.us/parks/petfair.html.

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Compare Dog Car Seat Brands

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 7, 2010

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Pet Auto Safety.com provides a number of selections of dog car seat brands and styles. All the dog car seat brands are good brands but some have more features and higher quality than others. In order to help you decide which dog car seat brand and style is right for you, please review the below information which is first organized by style then by price.

Dog car seat brands which hang from and wrap around the seat of your car:
1.  Kyjen Dog Car Booster Seat – Features air cushioning comfort and a high boost, for dogs up to 18 pounds, $39.99.
2.  Outward Hound Dog Car Booster Seat – Features a flexible bottom for comfort but no cushion and a high boost, for dogs up to 20 pounds, $39.99.
3.  Designer Elevated Dog Car Booster Seat – Features air cushioning comfort and a high boost, for dogs up to 30 pounds, $44.99.
4.  Skybox Dog Car Booster Seat – Features a thin cushion and a high boost, for dogs up to 30 pounds, $59.99. This dog car booster seat is very well made and has the highest quality of the dog car booster seat brands which hang from the headrest of the seat.

Dog car seat brands which strap in using the seat belt of the car:
5.  Guardian Gear Sightseers Dog Car Seat – Features no cushion and no boost, for dogs up to 20 pounds, $29.99.
6.  Roll Around Pet Travel Carrier – Features no cushion or boost. It has no strap to attach to your dog but your dog is zipped inside for safety. The Roll Around Pet Travel Carrier comes in three sizes – Small for dogs up to 7 pounds, $69.99; Medium for dogs up to 15 pounds, $79.99; Large for dogs up to 30 pounds, $89.99.
7. 
Lookout Perch Dog Car Seat – Features very good cushioning and a moderate to high boost. The half-bench is for dogs up to 35 pounds and costs $79.99. The full-bench is for dogs up to 70 pounds and costs $139.99.
8. 
Lookout & Lookout Deluxe Dog Safety Car Seat – Features very good cushioning and a moderate boost. The small is for dogs up to 20 pounds and the medium is for dogs up to 25 pounds. The small standard Lookout Dog Car Seat is $74.99 and the small Deluxe is $99.99. The medium standard Lookout Dog Car Seat is $109.99 and the medium Deluxe is $119.99.
9. 
My Buddy Dog Safety Car Seat – Features very good cushioning and a moderate boost, for dogs up to 30 pounds, $149.99.

10. Dog car seat brands which wrap around the console of your car feature very good cushioning and a moderate boost depending on how high your console is. The small console brand is for dogs up to 7 pounds and costs $64.99. The medium console dog car seat brand is for dogs up to 12 pounds and costs $84.99.

11. Dog car hammocks are also on the dog car seat page. But dog car hammocks are better for larger dogs while a dog car seat is generally better for smaller dogs (with the exception of the Lookout Perch Dog Car Seat).

Visit Pet Auto Safety.com to see photos of the different dog car seat brands.

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Help Your Dog Enjoy the Car Ride

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 4, 2010

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Some dogs absolutely love to ride in the car and some absolutely hate it. If your dog is one who hates riding in the car, there are a few things you can do to help him learn that riding in the car is not such a bad thing and potentially enjoyable.

Help Alleviate Car Sickness
Some dogs may hate riding in the car because they get car sick. A dog who is car sick may not show obvious signs such as vomiting. But he may drool a little bit more than usual. If you suspect your dog hates the car because he gets car sick, make sure he is sitting in the center of the back seat. This may help alleviate some of the motion sickness. Have a window rolled down so that your dog gets fresh air. Encourage your to sit up and look out the window. Being able to look out the window tends to help some dogs acclimate to the motion. If your dog is too small to look out the window, consider getting him a pet booster seat. A pet booster seat may help with your dog’s motion sickness, and it will definitely help with your dog’s safety.

Have Fun In The Car
Another thing which may help with motion sickness is to help keep your dog from thinking about the motion. Have someone sit in the back seat with your dog and distract them with a fun toy and/or treats. Make the car ride as fun as possible. Perhaps the person sitting in the back seat with your dog can also help encourage your dog to look out the window by pointing and saying, “What’s that?” in a happy voice. Have them point out fun stuff like other people. If your dog does not get aggressive when they see other dogs, point out other dogs as well.

Take Small Trips
Get your dog used to riding in the car by starting out with short trips. If you need to go to the bank or to a fast food drive through, take your dog. Take your dog anywhere where you will not have to get out of the car and leave your dog unattended. Small trips may help your dog come to understand that nothing bad happens on car rides.

Go Someplace Fun
It may also help to take you dog somewhere fun. This way, your dog learns to associate car rides with going somewhere they will enjoy. Take them to visit their favorite doggy pal. Take them to the park or to the dog park. Go to a restaurant with an outdoor patio which allows dogs. Or take them to the pet store. You don’t have to buy them anything at the pet store for your dog to enjoy visiting the pet store.

Don’t Console Your Dog
The above are tips on things you can do to help your dog enjoy the car ride. But here is a tip on what not to do. Do not soothe your pet. Do not give them a reason to think there is a reason that they need to be consoled. Ignore your dog if they seek you for comfort. And ignore them if they whine or cry. Don’t use harsh words against them. Instead, if your dog whines or cries, talk to them in a happy and encouraging voice. Or just sing happily out loud like nothing is wrong.

With some time, more experience, and positive reinforcement, your dog can learn that riding in the car is not such a big deal. And maybe they can even learn to love to ride in the car. When that happens, traveling with your dog will be much more fun for both of you.

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August 1, 2010

 

Check out Oliver in his new “chariot”… ie, dog booster seat.  Isn’t he adorable!  A dog booster seat is great for a little dog. Just check out what Oliver has to say. Oliver is comfortable and he can look out the window without having to stand on his hind legs. And most importantly, Oliver is safe. The dog booster seat is strapped to the front seat of the car. And it has another strap inside which clips onto the back of Oliver’s harness. That way, if his mom has to stop suddenly, poor Oliver doesn’t fly forward into the dash, the windshield, or onto the floor.

The dog booster seat which Oliver is riding is the red Outward Hound Dog Booster Seat.

Read the great testimonial from Oliver’s mom at the All Things Dog Blog.  Thanks Oliver for being so photogenic and for enjoying your dog booster seat.

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