You are currently browsing the Pet Auto Safety weblog archives for September, 2011.

Pages

BlogPaws/Pet360 Media Pet Blogger Network
Advertisements:

Archive for September, 2011

September 28, 2011
sadie.jpg

Sadie behind the BreezeGuard Window Screen.

Visit other great dog blogs for the Wordless Wednesday Blog Hop:

Did you like this? Share it:
September 27, 2011

goodideabadidea.jpg

Remember the Animaniacs? I loved them! This was the best and most hilarious cartoon ever, in my opinion. I loved their small segments of Pinky and the Brain, Slappy Squirrel, Chicken Boo, and Good Idea Bad Idea, just to name a few.

So in remembrance of my favorite cartoon, I have put together a list of good ideas and bad ideas for pet travel safety, then also shared an Animaniacs video.

Good Idea
Keeping the car windows rolled up or putting BreezeGuard Window Screens on the car windows before rolling them down.
Bad Idea
Letting your dog hang his head out the window. He can be hit with flying debris such as roadside trash, rocks, or someone flicking their cigarette butt out the window. Also, if you have to swerve your car suddenly, your dog could fly out and be injured.

Good Idea
Having your dog ride in the back seat.
Bad Idea
Having your dog ride in the front seat. Airbags are not safe for dogs and most cars nowadays have passenger side airbags.

Good Idea
Having your dog be safely restrained in the car.
Bad Idea
Letting your dog roam around in the car or sit in your lap. A dog who is free to do as he chooses in the car can be a very dangerous distraction. Although there is no law that says your dog has to be restrained in the car, you can get a ticket for reckless driving. Or a worst case scenario, your dog could be seriously injured or killed in a car accident.

I know, it is not as funny as the Animaniacs version. But it is still good advice so protect your pet and practice pet travel safety!

Did you like this? Share it:
September 24, 2011

yellow-labrador-retriever-front-seat-safety-barrier.jpg

Distractions cause over a million car accidents each year. These distractions include anything from talking on the cell phone, grooming, tending to a baby, and pet distractions. Keeping a dog in the back seat is an important pet auto safety feature which helps reduce the distraction a pet could cause. The Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier is the simplest way to achieve this.

The Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier is a piece of sturdy canvas which attaches easily by wrapping around the headrests of the front seats and around the bottom half of the front seats. Once attached, the canvas part of the pet car barrier blocks the center console area. This keeps most dogs from being able to put their head between the seats, from standing on the center console, and from jumping into the front seat.

Notice that we said ‘most dogs’. As you can see from the photo above, the Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier is only as high as the seats of your car. It does not go all the way to the ceiling so some dogs may try to jump over it. Therefore, the Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier works best for small to medium sized dogs. It can work for large dogs too if your large dog is not inclined to try to jump over it. If my dog Maya (the dog photographed above) was not wearing her dog car harness, she would probably try to jump it.

The Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier could help protect your dog in the event of a car accident. For small to medium sized dogs, your dog is not as likely to get thrown through the windshield in a front end car accident. But since the Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier does not go all the way to the ceiling, this is still a possibility. While other pet auto safety products exist for protecting your dog, the Outward Hound Pet Car barrier is relatively inexpensive and it is easy to use. Just remember that while it may be effective in keeping your dog from being a distraction, it does not provide the same safety as a dog car harness, pet car seat, or secured pet crate.

Did you like this? Share it:
September 22, 2011

 

Pet Booster Seat

In case of a car accident, airbags are a great safety device. Most cars nowadays have airbags for both the driver and the front passenger. But remember, airbags are made for adult people, not children or dogs. So if your dog rides in the car, be sure they are in an area that does not have airbags.

Most cars with passenger side airbags in the front seat only go off during a high impact car accident if there is someone sitting in that seat. Check with your car manufacturer to verify whether the passenger side airbags trigger automatically or only if there is a certain amount of weight in the seat. If your dog is a small dog, you may not need to worry about the airbag because the airbag sensor might not register anyone sitting in that seat. This is a safety feature that was set up to protect a child sitting in the front seat since you do not want the airbags to deploy for small children.

However, to be certain that the airbag does not deploy when your dog is in the front seat, check your car manual to see if the front passenger airbag can be disabled. If not, have your large dog ride in the back seat or have your small dog sit in a pet booster seat which hangs from the headrest of the seat rather than sits on the seat itself. With the pet booster seat hanging from the headrest, the airbag may not trigger since there is no weight in the seat. You can also push the seat as far back from the airbag as possible.

Did you like this? Share it:
September 21, 2011

No words, just whining.

Maya does this for at leat the first 15 minutes of every trip! And see how much she moves around? She is wearing a dog car harness for safety but it allows her some ability to move around. Imagin what she would be like in the car without her dog car harness.

Blog Hop for Wordless Wednesday to see other great dog photos.

Did you like this? Share it:
September 19, 2011

If you are in the Westport, Wisconsin area, be on the lookout for a black and white pit bull dog missing after a car crash. Her name is Pepper. Both her and her owner were injured in a car accident but Pepper got out of the car and ran off. Sorry, no photos available. The accident occurred on Sunday, September 18th on County M at Corner Court. This information comes from a Madison, Wisconsin news article at http://host.madison.com/article_671a1280-e2b3-11e0-acd9-001cc4c002e0.html. If you live in this area and have found this dog, please contact the information provided on this article.

Pepper was probably terrified from the accident and ran as far and as fast as she could in order to get away from it. This is a common reaction for dogs and happens all too frequently after a car accident. Pepper is hurt, confused, and frightened so if you see her, contact someone right away. If you choose to approach her yourself, be cautious. We are not certain of Pepper’s personality but a hurt dog, no matter how sweet, may be inclined to bite out of fear.

Did you like this? Share it:
September 17, 2011

Anyone have trouble getting their dog to get in the car? This is a great video by the Dog Whisperer, Cesar Milan. I agree with most of it but I am not too sure about how he pulled the dog into the car in the beginning of the video. The step up was a good idea and so was the refreshing blanket. I also agree that it is a matter of trust, not respect.

But rather than force her into the car, would it have been better to help her associate the car with good things first rather than force her in? Perhaps if they sat on the edge and coaxed the dog in with treats and the ‘kissy’ voice? Or if they went inside and called the dog in? If the dog only put his front paws up, then give treat and praise lavishly. After several successful trials, move the treat further back and eventually work up to get the dog to come all the way in. Any thoughts?

Did you like this? Share it:
September 15, 2011

finalposterpaws2011web.jpg

Yay! It’s time once again for the annual Paws in the Park at Gage Park in Topeka. This pet event, which is held Saturday, September 17th between 9am and 12pm, is the biggest fundraiser held by the Helping Hands Humane Society. Participate in the walk for $40 and help thousands of homeless pets. For your participation, you will also receive a t-shirt, pet bandana, and lots of goodies.

If you’re not up for the walk, there will be lots of pet vendors to visit, pancakes and sausage to eat, and pet contests to enter. We, as PetAutoSafety.com and AnimalFigurineStore.com, will be there as a vendor.  Come join us for some howlin’ good fun! For more information on this great pet event visit the Helping Hands Humane Society of Topeka.

Did you like this? Share it:

Wordless Wednesday Dog Blogs

Author: MayaAndPierson
September 14, 2011
killerdriving.jpg

Killer at the Wheel
(My parent’s dog, Killer, behind the wheel of a car.)
(Killer has since passed on.  Check out his story at Saying Goodbye to Killer)

Visit lots of great dog blogs!

Did you like this? Share it:
September 11, 2011

[youtube LOJ3EQcUZsE]

We found this great video on http://dogandcar.com/.

Did you like this? Share it: