Pages

BlogPaws/Pet360 Media Pet Blogger Network
Advertisements:
September 2, 2014

ClickIt Sport Dog Car Harness on Dogs

When the ClickIt Utility came out in the fall of 2013, it was rated as the safest dog car harness by the non-profit organization, The Center for Pet Safety (CPS). It is a fantastic seat belt that helps keep your dog very secure in the car. But since it is a brand new design, it has a few drawbacks. One, it is difficult to size and adjust. Two, it is a little bulky for smaller dogs. The company that designed the ClickIt Utility has listened to our feedback and designed the new ClickIt Sport.

LIGHT WEIGHT
The ClickIt Utility dog car harness is heavier and bulkier, which makes it less than ideal for some dogs. The ClickIt Sport promises to be lighter in weight but still have the same safety durability.

EASIER TO USE
The ClickIt Sport still has three points of contact and so will still be very restrictive. However, it is easier to connect these three points on the ClickIt Sport than it is on the ClickIt Utility. It no longer requires the latchbar connections so it can be used in older cars.

EASIER FIT
The sizing is more adjustable, allowing it to fit a larger range of dog shapes and sizes.

CPS CERTIFIED
Not only did Sleepypod, the company that designed the ClickIt Sport, crash test this pet travel product themselves, they also had it tested by an independent nonprofit organization called The Center for Pet Safety (CPS). If you recall, CPS did an extensive crash test study on 11 dog seat belts in 2013. They have since streamlined their studies and offer a CPS certification to any company who wants their dog seat belts tested. This is a voluntary service and the tests are rigorous. As of the date of this post, the ClickIt Sport is the only dog car harness to have received the CPS Certification.

ADDITIONAL FEATURES
A new infinity loop design (patent pending) reduces the pressure on a dog in a car accident and eliminates the need for metal hardware. It is now easier to attach a leash to the ClickIt Sport for walking. And the harness now has added reflector strips.

COMING THIS FALL
We don’t yet know when in fall the ClickIt Sport will be available, but we are staying on top of it and hope to have them in no more than a week after Sleepypod releases them. So stay tuned!

Did you like this? Share it:
January 6, 2014

 

Maya ClickIt Utility Pet Seat Belt

For Maya, safety means having to sit still in the car, not being able to puther head out the window, and wearing a seat belt. But she’s still happy despite her lack of freedom in the car.

Welcome to 2014! A new year means getting a fresh start. It means resolving to do what you’ve been putting off. You and your dog are going to get fit, you’re going to eat better, and you’re going to do more fun activities together. When making all these resolutions, don’t forget to include the safety of your best furry friend.

Use a Pet Travel Safety Device
You know, I can’t mention pet safety without mentioning dog seat belts or pet travel carriers. If your dog rides in the car, it is a good idea to make sure he rides safe. If he won’t wear a car harness or ride in a crate, at least consider covering the floor of the back seat or putting up a barrier to separate the front and the back of the vehicle. The Backseat Bridge is a great way to do both. By putting this in your car, you can help keep your dog from getting thrown onto the floor or into the front seat. The barrier might even keep him from trying to climb in the front.

Pierson in the Car Logo

The Backseat Bridge covers the floor of the car and has a divider blocking the center console.

Don’t Leave Your Pet in the Car
Resolve to never go anywhere with your dog where you have to leave him alone in the car. In spring and summer, you have to worry about the vehicle trapping heat. In the fall and winter, you have to worry about the car acting as a freezer. Plus, there is a danger of theft. And don’t even tell me about the sorts of people who hate animals and like to maliciously tease them.

Keep Head and Paws Inside the Vehicle
Also, make sure when your pet rides in the car that he doesn’t put his head or paws out the window. If you have to stop or swerve suddenly, your dog could choke or get thrown out of the vehicle. It’s happened, people. It really has. Flying road debris could also hurt your best friend’s eyes or nose. Not only are there small pebbles to worry about, but also trash that people toss out their windows.

Pierson Breeze Guard Car Window Screens

Pierson can’t put his head out the window because it is fitted with the Breeze Guard car window screens. I love these screens! I can put the window down and still keep my dogs safe. Click Pierson’s photo to find out more.

Don’t Ride in the Back of a Pickup
And for goodness sake, don’t let your dog ride in the back of a pickup. This is becoming illegal in more and more places. And for a very good reason.

Wear a Dog Life Jacket
Besides protection in cars, there are other safety things to consider for your pet. If your dog likes to swim or ride in a boat, make sure he wears a safety vest. Even though my Maya can swim, I generally have her wear a life jacket when she swims in a lake. This is because she loves swimming so much that I worry about her swimming too far after a stick or a ball. I worry about her getting too tired in the water.

Maya and her dog life jacket.

Maya wears her dog life jacket when she goes swimming at Clinton Lake.

Protect From Weather
Keep your dog safe then they are outdoors in adverse weather. Adverse weather includes rain, sleet, snow, and even the sun. If your dog spends a lot of time outdoors, make sure he has shelter. Shelter can help protect him against all sorts of weather. Always make sure he has fresh water. This is vital, but even more so in the heat. Protect paws from hot pavements and icy sidewalks, have short-coated dogs wear coats or sunscreen, and if hiking in nature watch out for wild animals and insects.

Wear a Lighted Collar
If you walk your dog at night, be sure your dog wears a lighted collar or reflective safety vest. If not your dog, at least yourself. Well, don’t wear a collar but at least carry some sort of light with you. You may see a car coming because of their headlights, but they can’t always see you.

Light Dog Collars 2

Pierson wears a light collar that dangles from his neck. Because his hair is so long, he can’t wear the glow collar that Maya is wearing.

Get Safe Chew Toys
If your dog is a chewer, resolve to find more dog toys that are indestructible. Resolve to supervise your dog whenever he plays with certain toys. Keep things that are unsafe to chew or eat out of his reach.

Pierson Kong Flyer Spring 2013 018

Pierson loves the indestructible Kong Flyer dog toy.

There are a lot of other pet safety things to consider, but I can hardly think of them all. Besides, pet car safety is my specialty. :)

What do you do to protect your best friend’s safety?

Did you like this? Share it:
December 9, 2013
Maya Resting in Car

Are we there yet?

It’s almost time for our annual road trip from Kansas to Texas to visit family. The drive takes about eleven hours. Taking such a long trip with two big dogs requires careful preparation and planning.

Why Do We Drive?

An eleven hour trip sounds intimidating. But when you have two big dogs, visiting family for the holidays doesn’t leave many options. Boarding kennels and pet sitters tend to be booked up this time of year. Flying can be expensive, not to mention a very stressful situation for pets that need to ride in the cargo area of the plane. Winter weather can also prevent your dog from being able to fly.

While driving requires several hours of our vacation to be spent on the road, for us it is the best option. I’m not sad and worried about Maya and Pierson because they’re with me. And the gas expense is less than one flight ticket.

Maya Pierson Cookietown

PREPARING FOR THE TRIP

The Vehicle

Now that we know we are going to drive, we just need to work out the logistics. Is our vehicle in good shape, including the tires? Is a car enough, or should we rent an SUV? Last year we rented an SUV because our friends went with us and four adults and two big dogs just wouldn’t fit in our sedan.

My Dogs in Back of SUV

This is the vehicle we rented last year for our trip to Texas.

This year it is just my husband and I and the two dogs so we can take our car. We’re not taking mine this year, though. We are taking my husband’s. My car is already fitted with all the dog gear, but it is an older model vehicle and I don’t want to risk it breaking down on the way. So before our trip, I need to outfit my husband’s Camry for Maya and Pierson. The first thing it needs is a seat cover. I will also install the Backseat Bridge because it covers the floor and gives my big pups more room to stretch out for the long trip.

Pet Travel Products in My Car

This is my Car. It has the Backseat Bridge to cover the floor, a seat cover, and BreezeGuard window screens on the windows. I’ve also since added car door guards.

Hotel

Will we do the entire drive all in one day, or will we stay overnight at a hotel? Most times, we drive straight through. But this year, we are visiting friends in Tulsa and so will stay in a hotel. To prepare, we need to find a pet friendly hotel in Tulsa and make reservations.

Health & Temperament

Maya and Pierson are in good health and so will be fine on this trip. But depending on your pet, you may want to consider his health before going on your road trip. In addition, think about how much or how little your dog likes to ride in the car. If he doesn’t like to ride, you may need to start getting him used to it now by taking short road trips to somewhere fun. You can also ask your vet about possible pet anxiety treatments you can give him.

Pack

A week before the trip, I compile a packing list. I add to it as things come to mind so that by the day of the trip, I know everything I need to take. For the dogs, I need their food, treats, food and water bowls, water, toys, blankets, beds, leashes, veterinary records, poop bags, their dog seat belts, first aid kit, and I need to make sure their id tags are secure on their collars. Since we are staying in a hotel, I should think about bringing their pet crates too.

Right Before We Leave

Besides checking off the packing list and making sure our vehicle has gas, I also like to administer Travel Calm to both Maya and Pierson. Maya gets excited in the vehicle and the all natural Travel Calm really helped keep her relaxed and quiet on our trip last year. Pierson sometimes gets car sick and Travel Calm helps with that too.

The next thing we do before we go is let the dogs go potty. And the final thing is to make sure our house is secure. If we didn’t already have someone watching our house, we’d be talking to our neighbors to ask them to keep an eye out. We’d also reduce the thermostat and make sure we didn’t leave any unnecessary appliances turned on.

THE ROAD TRIP

When traveling such a long distance, it is a good idea for us and the dogs to make plenty of pit stops. We stop at rest areas or gas stations to stretch our legs or use the restroom. For the dogs, I make sure their leashes are secure before letting them out of the car. It helps that they are already secured in their dog seat belts. All I have to do is attach their leash, then release the buckle that keeps them secured.

When I take them to go potty, I make sure they only go in designated pet areas. And I always pick up after them. If we’re in a public area, I am careful about not imposing my dogs on other people. I keep control of them as much as possible for both their safety and for the sake of others.

While it would probably be much more convenient if we could travel without having to worry about the dogs, I really enjoy taking them. For me, the holidays just wouldn’t be the same without my Maya and Pierson. If you’re traveling by car this holiday and taking your best friend with you, consider our preparation plans and apply them for your situation. And send us pictures! :)

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

Did you like this? Share it:

Follow Up Friday #20

Author: MayaAndPierson
November 22, 2013

Follow Up Friday Banner Logo

Thanks again to Jodi with Heart Like a Dog for hosting another Follow Up Friday. This week’s guest host is Donna from Donna and the Dogs.

I have had a lot of great questions and comments about dog seat belts this week, so let’s jump right in with the recap.

LAST WEEK’S FOLLOW UP

Jodi with Heart Like a Dog asked how to determine the correct size of pet car harness to get. Each brand has a different method, which can make things kind of confusing. So the first thing to do is determine which brand to get.

The Bergan makes it easy to determine what size is needed. All you need to know is the weight of your dog. Kurgo, too, can go by weight, but knowing your dog’s chest measurement also helps. The Ruff Rider Roadie also needs the chest measurement.

Measure your dog’s chest by wrapping a tape measure around the biggest part of his chest. Use the two-finger rule, which means put two fingers under the measure when you do this. The measurement is also called the girth. Maya’s girth is 31 inches. According to Kurgo’s measurement guidelines, Maya would need a large which fits dogs with a girth between 24 and 34 inches. According to the Ruff Rider Roadie, she’d need a medium 2.

Maya's Measurement for Dog Seat Belt

Maya gets her girth measured to see what size of dog seat belt is right for her.

The ClickIt Utility pet car harness requires a different measurement. You have to measure both your dog’s neck and chest in a figure 8. Here’s a video with detailed instructions – Sizing for ClickIt Utility dog seat belts.

ClickIt Harness Sizing

Measuring for the ClickIt Utility pet car harness: Starting at the top, wrap the tape measure around your dog’s chest, then neck, in a figure-8.

Flea with Dog Treat Web for Jones Natural Chews compared the use of a pet car harness to when seat belt laws for people first became mandatory. It took a lot of persuasion (and threats of getting a ticket) to convince people to wear them. Today, it still takes some convincing. Perhaps someday, we will all see the benefits for ourselves and our family, including our pets.

Hawk with Brown Dog CBR said, “I need a longer tether for my harness. I prefer my crate, but my size or rather the crate’s size prevents it fitting into the car. I HATE the harness and seat belt! It always get all twisted whenever I need to lay down. The harness fits perfectly, but the tether is WAY too short to allow any movement.” With the recent research that determined all dog seat belts may not be as safe as we like, a lot of people are considering pet travel crates. But you’re right, Hawk. This is not easy to do for big dogs. There is no way Maya and Pierson’s dog crate will fit in my car. Speaking of tangling in the tethers, the brand I’ve found the best is the Bergan tether. It is sold separately so that you don’t have to buy the whole harness. Kurgo also has a direct connect tether – Replacement Tethers for harnesses.

POOP PATROL

Regarding the importance of picking up your dog’s poop when traveling, Roxy with Roxy the Traveling Dog says, “Very true, because we are always traveling, I have bags in the truck, in my purse, sometimes in my pocket. I always pick up the poop.” Me too! I have poop bags in the car and in all my coat pockets. I don’t carry around a purse so my cell phone, driver’s license, and credit cards are always in my pants pockets, along with a few poop bags.

Sugar with Sugar the Golden Retriever noted about how some parks are beginning to restrict dogs to certain areas. This is because people aren’t picking up after their dogs. So it is very important that we show how responsible we can be when it comes to our furry best friends.

FUNNY DOGS CAR TALK ADVENTURES

The first episode of Maya and Pierson’s car travel video is finally finished! If you missed it, check it out below.

Be sure to give it a thumbs up on YouTube! Maya, Pierson, and I would love it if you’d share it too. :)

Snoopy with Snoopy’s Dog Blog said, “I loved the video!! It was very informative, but in a cool and fun way – great job! Looking forward to the next videos – Maybe Maya and Pierson will be getting and Oscar for their performances?”

Thanks so much, Snoopy! They might not get an Oscar, but they got a lot of treats for cooperating so well. When Maya said, “Huh?” in the video, it was because I said the word “cookie”. And Pierson really does need bribing sometimes when it comes to getting in the car.

CONTEST GIVEAWAY

I have a bunch of figurines left over from another website I used to run for animal figurines, so I thought I would give some away. Sorry I’m not giving away something as exciting as pet travel supplies this time. But I will in December, I promise! In the meantime, there is still a chance to win a cute dog figurine. If you’re not interested in one for yourself, it might make a good gift. Or if your shelter or rescue group does auctions to raise money, you can give it to them. The contest is open until the end of the month.

Well, that’s all I have for this week. Thanks for stopping by! And thank you to Jodi and Donna for hosting the Follow Up Friday blog hop!

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

Did you like this? Share it:
November 17, 2013

Funny Dogs Car Talk Adventures

The first episode of Maya and Pierson’s car travel video is finally done! My dogs Maya and Pierson ride in the car while wearing their pet car restraints and have interesting conversations. In this first funny video from Pet Auto Safety, Maya and Pierson talk about why they wear their dog seat belts. I tried to make it a bit humorous so that it isn’t the same old boring lecture. Watch it and tell me what you think.

So, how do you like it? If you enjoyed it, can you do me a favor and give it a thumbs up on YouTube?

Future videos will be less informative and more fun. Hopefully, the next video will not take 7 months to make. If you’d like to know what making this first video entailed, keep reading. It’s a bit dry, so feel free to skip this next part and leave a comment about the video at the end of the post. You can also leave a comment about the video on YouTube. Thanks everyone! :)

SEVEN MONTHS IN THE MAKING

I purchased a nice camcorder and video editing software at the end of March 2013. My camera is the JVC Evirio and the video editing software is the Movie Edit Pro 2013 from Magix. I started using the camcorder right away, but when I first downloaded the software I was greatly intimidated. How on earth would I figure this program out without someone to teach me? I don’t know about you, but reading the instruction manual did not appeal to me one little bit.

So I procrastinated on learning the video editing software. I wasn’t completely putting off this project, though. I started brainstorming video ideas, writing scripts, and trying to figure out how I was going to get a male Australian accent for Pierson.

Once I finally had these things ready, I started playing with the video editing software. I learned by playing with it, and only referred to the manual when there was something specific I really wanted to do but couldn’t figure out how. The first two videos I made with this software are of me drawing the dog Mos and of my dog Maya playing in a public pool.

The next snag in making the Pet Auto Safety video was how to mount the camera in the car. After trying various methods, I finally found a decent car camera mount. The video was now underway. Maya and Pierson wore their pet car restraints and cooperated very well as I drove around town with the video camera set to record. Now that I think I have a pretty good idea of what I’m doing, I believe Episode 2 will take a lot less time to make. Perhaps I can have it ready in January or February. I’d say sooner, except the holidays may hold me back.

Thanks for stopping by and checking out my video! :)

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

Did you like this? Share it:
November 4, 2013

Here is a simplified but extensive list of the pros and cons of the dog seat belts we currently have available at PetAutoSafety.com:

Maya ClickIt Utility Dog Seat Belt

I was pleasantly surprised at how well the ClickIt Utility dog seat belt kepy my crazy dog Maya in her seat.

CLICKIT UTILITY CANINE CAR HARNESS

Pro and Con – This harness is very restrictive on your dog. This is a pro because the Center for Pet Safety has concluded that the more restricted your dog is, the safer he is likely to be in a car accident. This is a con because some dogs hate to be restricted. While the ClickIt Utility allows your dog to sit and lie down, it does not allow him to stand. And he cannot move around very easily.

Pros
*
The top rated brand in regards to safety
*
Three point attachment system for ultimate safety
*
Padded vest
*
Vest lies low on the chest to prevent choking
*
Can easily be used for walking as well as riding
*
Keeps your dog on the seat
*
Prevents side-to-side movements, which can be beneficial in an auto accident
*
Comes in three different colors

Cons
*
It can’t be used for very small dogs. The extra small is actually for larger small dogs.
*
It can only be used in the back seat and only if your vehicle is a 2001 model and later. These newer vehicles have latchbars located between the seat cushions and they are necessary in order to secure your dog with the ClickIt Utility harness.
* Your dog will not be able to stand up or move around while wearing this canine car harness
* Can be difficult putting it on and adjusting it for the first time
* Some reported that when dogs try to move around, they get tangled in the securing straps.

*
Expensive

Ruff Rider Roadie Dog Seat Belt

The Ruff Rider Roadie, in business since 1996, is the next best safety brand after the ClickIt.

RUFF RIDER ROADIE

Pros
* The Ruff Rider Roadie is n
ot as restrictive as the ClickIt Utility so your dog can move around a little more
*
Safety rating is better than most other brands tested (except ClickIt)
*
Converts easily into a walking harness
*
Pleated under the front legs in order to prevent chaffing
*
Available for almost every size of dog
* Your dog may be able to sit, stand, or lie down while wearing the Ruff Rider Roadie
*
Can be used with a car seat belt or in the cargo area if cargo rings are present
*
Pressure in a car accident goes on the dog’s chest, not is throat, so no choking
* Made in the USA

Cons
*
No padded vest
*
Tether adjustment is minimal
*
A dog that tries to moves around a lot could get tangled. Using the longer adjustment or using the carabiner to secure your dog instead could help prevent this. But a longer tether decreases safety.
*
Because it doesn’t restrict your dog as much as the ClickIt, there is risk that your dog will launch off the seat or side to side in a car accident.
*
Tether is non-detachable. It can be used as a leash for walking but is not very long.
*
Comes only in one color
*
Pricy (not as expensive than the ClickIt but more expensive than many other brands)

Pierson Wearing Bergan Dog Seat Belt

Pierson looks very handsome in his padded Bergan dog seat belt harness. And he doesn’t get tangled in the adjustable tether.

BERGAN DOG SEAT BELT HARNESS

Pros
* The Bergan canine car harness has a v
ery well padded vest
*
Fits all but very small dogs
*
Depending on if your vehicle has cargo rings, it may be used in the cargo area of an SUV
*
Neck and chest strap is fully adjustable
*
Less risk of tangling with this tether
* Tether is adjustable in length
*
Affordable pricing

Cons
* The Bergan c
an’t easily be used as a walking harness
* The small may be too big for smaller small dogs
* Failed crash testing at extra-large size
*
Padding comes a little higher up the chest. Unknown risk of choking.
*
Because it doesn’t restrict your dog as much as the ClickIt, there is risk that your dog will launch off the seat or side to side in a car accident.
* Can be a challenge when putting it on and adjusting it for the first time
*
Comes only in one color (mossy oak was another color but has been discontinued and only available while supplies last)

Maya Go-Tech Pet Seat Belts

The raspberry Kurgo Go-Tech is the perfect color for my girl Maya. I love the padded chest and how it lies lower and looser around the neck.

KURGO DOG SEAT BELTS

Pros
* Kurgo dog seat belts have a p
added vest
*
Can easily be used as a walking harness
*
Walking leash can be attached at the back or the front of the chest to limit pulling
* Kurgo
Go-Tech style has a low and loose neck to prevent choking
*
Lots of cool colors available
*
Affordable pricing

Cons
*
Tru-Fit style failed at 25lb and 75lb crash testing (passed at 45lbs)
*
It can only be used with the seat belt of the car. It can’t be used in the cargo area.
*
Dogs that like to move around can get tangled in the tether mechanism. The direct connect tether can be purchased separately and can help prevent tangling. However, a longer tether means a decrease in safety.
*
Go-Tech style neck is not adjustable
*
Because it doesn’t restrict your dog as much as the ClickIt, there is risk that your dog will launch off the seat or side to side in a car accident.

Guardian Gear Plaid Dog Seat Belts

These plaid dog seat belts from Guardian Gear are adorable, but consider them as a prevention against driver distraction rather than for safety.

GUARDIAN GEAR / CRUISING COMPANION (STANDARD)

Pros
*
Very inexpensive
*
Lots of cool colors and styles
*
Some are padded
*
No tangling or twisting with the tethers
*
Can be used as a walking harness

Cons
*
Not designed to hold up in a car accident. May help to keep dogs from being a distraction to the driver and may help for sudden stops, but there are no other safety features.
*
Some may come up high on the neck, risking choking
*
Our site has limited colors and sizes available because we are no longer keeping this dog seat belt harness brand in stock.

We hope this list is helpful. If you have any other questions or concerns about our dog seat belt harness brands, please feel free to email us at naturebydawn@aol.com.

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

Did you like this? Share it:
October 2, 2013

Every couple of months, the Lawrence Humane Society has a little gathering called the Mutt Mixer. It is where people can come to bring their dogs and they get to hang around in the huge exercise pens with other dogs. The mixing part is the dogs with homes and their people get to meet dogs up for adoption. It’s a great socializing activity that Maya loves. I like it too, but I mostly hang out outside of the fenced area at a small table where I have the dog seat belts. I still get to socialize, though! :) Here are some of the photos from the event last Thrusday (the 26th).

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 1

Maya is making friends.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 2

The Lawrence Humane Society has huge fenced-in areas for the dogs to run around in.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 3

This is Reno having a good time at the September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 4

This is Brownie having a good time at the September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 5

They had pools for the dogs to play in at the event. Maya was the first to test one out.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 7

Maya played with people more than with other dogs at the Mutt Mixer event.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 8

Maya really knows how to make people visiting the event feel special.

September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event 9

This is Spud, a Frenchie, who came to check out the September 2013 Mutt Mixer Event.

These other photos are from the same event held in May.

2013 May Mutt Mixer - 1

From the May 2013 Mutt Mixer at the Lawrence Humane Society.

 

2013 May Mutt Mixer - 2

More doggies and my Maya mixing it up at the Mutt Mixer.

 

We didn’t make it to the one in July. View our posts from the end of July to see why.

Do you have any fun events for dogs in your neighborhood?

There are more fun pet photos on the Wordless Wednesday blog hop below:

Did you like this? Share it:
August 31, 2013

Last Saturday, I talked about the reasons why a dog should be restrained in the car. The post mostly focused on the benefits of a pet car harness. But let’s face it, not every dog will wear one. Plus, there are a few legitimate concerns about dog seat belts. So here are some other pet travel products to consider:

Straps for Pet Carriers

This Pet Travel Carrier secured in the car with kennel straps.

Pet Carrier
Have your pet ride in a pet carrier. Make sure the carrier is secured in the vehicle so that if the car goes out of control, the dog crate stays in place. You don’t want it and your dog to be thrown about. Whether a secured travel crate is as safe as a pet car harness is not known. Not much testing has been done on pet travel carriers. However, I imagine that a secured crate is probably just as safe (strictly an opinion). Traveling in this way covers all the reasons discussed last week about why it is better to have your dog secured in the car.

Maya Behind Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier

This is a cloth barrier. A pet car barrier can also be metal or a pet net barrier.

Dog Car Barrier
A dog car barrier can help keep your dog in the back seat and from being a distraction. Depending on the barrier, it may keep your dog from being ejected out the front windshield. However, it can’t keep your dog on the seat and it can’t keep him inside the vehicle if someone opens the door, a window breaks and he jumps out, or he hangs his head out the window and jumps or is thrown out.

Maya Showing Off Her Favorite Pet Travel Products

Maya has more room to stretch out on those long road trips.

Backseat Bridge
I can’t tell you how much I really love the Kurgo Backseat Bridge. I have two big dogs and there is no way Maya can stay comfortably on the back seat, even with her pet car harness on. The seat is too narrow and Maya is too big. And she is too energetic to sit still. So covering the floor of the car helps keep her from being thrown onto the floor. If you’ve read some of the news about how dogs should stay on the seat when wearing their dog seat belts, you can see how difficult it would be to restrain a dog to such an extent that he wouldn’t get thrown forward or onto the floor. The Backseat Bridge can help because it covers the floor. The Backseat Bridge also has a barrier that covers the center console area. If your dog is not buckled in, at least the bridge can keep him from getting thrown onto the floor and possibly keep him in the back seat so that he is not a distraction. A dog car hammock has the same benefits as the Kurgo Backseat Bridge.

Dog Pierson K9 Car Fance

Pierson is testing the K9 CarFence.

K9 CarFence
This is a brand new product. There hasn’t been much testing on it yet. But it sure looks promising. The K9 CarFence keeps your dog from being a distraction and it helps to keep him in his seat.

Pierson Breeze Guard Car Window Screens

Pierson is looking out the window fitted with the Breeze Guard car window screens.

Breeze Guard Car Window Screens
This is another product I really love. I used to let my dogs put their heads out the window. After all, they really love it. But one time, Sephi yelped. I think she got hit in the face with something, probably a small pebble. Thankfully, it didn’t hit her in the eye or nose. She wasn’t injured. But it made me think that perhaps letting her have her head out the window wasn’t such a good idea. Also, a friend of mine on Facebook told me about how a friend of hers had her dog thrown out the car window. He was hanging out having a good time when they suddenly had to swerve their car. Their poor dog flew out and ended up getting run over by the rear tire. And, one final story, I had a dog years ago that actually jumped out the car window. Luckily, we were driving slowly down an old dirt road when Huckleberry saw some cows and jumped out to get at them. He was okay. It shocked us both. But all these incidents will never happen again because of my Breeze Guard car window screens. BTW, despite having screens on my windows to allow the breeze in, I never ever leave my dogs unattended in the car.

If you’re concerned about the safety of your pet but aren’t sure about the safety of pet travel products, there are a lot of alternatives to consider. A pet car harness and pet carrier have a lot more safety benefits, but every dog and every situation is different. Consider your various options and feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns.

Did you like this? Share it:

Follow Up Friday #6

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 9, 2013
Dogs Pet Safety Belts

Maya and Pierson wearing a pet car harness. The back seat is also fitted with the Backseat Bridge from Kurgo.

We’ve had a couple of wonderful questions about dog seat belts and the Backseat Bridge this week! Donna with WeLiveInAFlat had an incident where they had to slam on the brakes, causing the dog to get thrown onto the floor. The question was whether there was a difference between a regular harness and a pet car harness.

We were happy to hear that the dog was okay. Scary!!! And all just because of a quick stop! Yes, there is a difference between a harness and a pet car harness. There is a difference in safety. A regular harness might be okay for a sudden stop like the one described. But a dog car harness is designed to fit better and to be stronger in more serious incidents.

We directed them to our site where there was information on safety as well as some videos. One of the videos found was from Kurgo.

Notice the dog still flies off the seat. WeLiveInAFlat had some concerns about this. We agree that a dog would still fly off the seat. Keeping the tether short could help. The Center for Pet Safety is continuing to do more studies on the safety of dog seat belts. The tests are ongoing so there haven’t been any new publications. But I do know that most of the positive testing results they have had were on harnesses with short tethers.

Hawk with BrownDogCBR asks: “A bridge is a good idea. What happens when one front seat passenger has the seat forward and the other has it back and somewhat reclined?”

Our reply: “Very good question, Hawk! It will still work, but there will be gaps and this could be an issue. The Backseat Bridge has a flap that goes up along the back of the front seats in order to try to cover that gap. However, if you are loose in the back seat and step in that area just right, you could get your foot caught. I would try to lessen those gaps or cover them as much as possible. The bridge fits most average sized vehicles, but if your car is wider than most, you could also have those gaps on the sides.”

I would also like to add that the Backseat Bridge could help in the situation observed by WeLiveInAFlat by keeping dogs from getting thrown onto the floor.

Pierson Wearing the Bergan Dog Car Harness

Lindsay and her dog Ace with ThatMutt held a calendar contest this past month. I entered a great photo of Pierson playing in the snow, then I begged for Like votes on Facebook. The contest ended yesterday and I am happy to say that Pierson is a tentative winner! Why tentative? He received enough likes, but Lindsay needs to make sure the photo entry meets all the guidelines. The winners will be officially announced on Monday. In the meantime, go visit her Facebook contest page and go check out the ThatMutt blog.

Thanks again for all the wonderful questions. You all bring out some great points and possible drawbacks of some of the products. Keep them coming. They help people make educated decisions and I’d rather people know what to expect in advance than to find out later. These discussions also help stimulate the manufacturers into continuing to make improvements.

Thanks again and have a wonderful weekend!  :)

Join the Blog Hop for Follow Up Friday below!

Follow Up Friday Banner Logo

 

Did you like this? Share it:
July 27, 2013

You will never believe this, but my dog Maya was involved in her first (and hopefully only) auto accident. Thursday, July 25th, we were on our way to the Lawrence Humane Society for their Mutt Mixer event. I was to have a table of pet auto safety supplies set up and Maya was to model the new Kurgo Go-Tech pet car harness.

Before you get worried about us, we are both okay. I was at a full stop waiting for traffic when I was rear ended. It was on wet street going downhill. The impact was pretty jarring. My boxes of dog seat belts, which I was going to display at the event, went flying everywhere. My rear bumper was damaged. But Maya and I were wearing our seat belts and we were not noticeably injured.

Rear Bumper Car Collision Damage

Rear bumper damage on my car from a rear end collision on July 25th, 2013.

I felt a little sore the next day, especially in the neck and shoulders, but Maya has been her usual happy-go-lucky self. Gotta love the resilient attitude of the Labrador! If it had been my Aussie mix Pierson involved in the car collision, he would have freaked out. And he would never want to ride in the car again.

Bad luck that Maya and I were in an auto accident, but good luck that it wasn’t too serious. Car collisions happen all the time with fender bender collisions being the most common. And even though you might be a safe driver, you never know what conditions or situations might arise that cause an auto accident to occur. This is why everyone in our family including my dogs wears a seat belt.

Be proactive, not reactive. And secure your pet in the vehicle now. It doesn’t have to be a seat belt. You can also use a pet trave crate.

Right Side of Car Rear Bumper Collision Left Rear Bumper Car Collision

Did you like this? Share it: