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August 5, 2014

Pierson Pet Flat Seat Ruff Rider

Pierson has actually been using the Ruff Rider Roadie for some time. He actually has several dog car harness brands to choose from, but I’ve been using the Roadie almost exclusively since that report from the Center for Pet Safety came out in October 2013. Besides safety, there are a lot of other reasons why I love this brand. So let me share them with you, along with some opposing features.

SAFETY
The Center for Pet Safety did an independent crash test study of various dog seat belt brands in October 2013, and I’m happy to say that the Roadie did very well. They determined the ClickIt Utility to be the safest and the Roadie and the AllSafe followed 2nd. This information makes me feel better about my boy Pierson’s safety.

COMFORT
One thing about the safest ClickIt Utility brand is that it is also the most restrictive. You dog can’t stand up in it and will have a difficult time moving from the sitting to the laying down position. This restriction is a good thing in safety, but let’s face it, many dogs do not like to be that restricted. One great thing about the Ruff Rider Roadie is that it can allow your dog a little more freedom to move. Its tether has two setting, one that makes the tether very short and one that makes it a little longer. With the longer option, your dog can sit, stand, and lay down with ease. Pierson is good about staying in one place in the car, so I generally use the shorter tether option.

Ruff Rider Roadie Dog Car Harness on Pierson

MADE IN USA
Nope, the ClickIt Utility is not made in the USA. Neither is the AllSafe. But the Ruff Rider Roadie dog seat belt is made right here in the United States. And it has been around and continuously improving for 15 years.

FITS ALL SIZES
Pierson is a medium sized dog, so he doesn’t have a problem in sizing. But you should know the ClickIt and the AllSafe are not made to fit very small dogs. The Roadie, on the other hand, does fit little pets.

CONSTRUCTION
The Roadie pet car harness is very well made. The material is a very strong webbing, yet not bulky. The size adjusting buckle is plastic, but this buckle is not part of what keeps the harness on your dog. If it breaks, your dog will still be in his harness.

DESIGN
The Roadie does not have a padded chest piece like the ClickIt or AllSafe. But the cross piece is designed to lie low on your dog’s chest so that it doesn’t choke him. Pierson likes it because it’s comfortable without being bulky.

CONS?
Because the Ruff Rider Roadie pet seat belt isn’t put on with clasps, it can be a bit difficult to put on. Luckily, my Pierson is very cooperative. He’s been wearing dog car harnesses since the day I got him, so he allows me to slip the Roadie on and put each of his legs in the leg holes. If you have a dog that doesn’t hold still well or is likely to resist, then you may have a challenge in putting this one on.

Because the Roadie doesn’t have clasps and because it has to be adjusted loose enough to put on your dog, it fits a little loose. This is actually a good thing. You don’t want a harness that is too tight. If you have a dog that keeps trying to get out of his dog seat belt, a tighter fit is not going to stop him from trying. The tighter it is, the more likely he is to hurt himself when he tries to get out of it. With training, a dog is more likely to get used to a loosely comfortable harness than a tight fitting one.

The Ruff Rider Roadie has seven different sizes. This makes it a bit difficult in determining which size to get your dog. At the same time, because it has so many different sizes, it is likely to fit many more dog breeds than other brands.

When shopping for the right pet car harness for you and your dog, look at safety, but also be aware of the possible cons. The Ruff Rider Roadie is almost perfect because it has such a high safety rating yet only a few cons. It is also very competitively priced. I love the Roadie. And although Pierson is not thrilled with the process of me putting it on him, he is very comfortable in it once it is on.

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July 31, 2014

“Help! I just bought this dog seat belt so that I can help keep my pet safe in the car, but he keeps trying to chew it off. What do I do?”

This happens all the time. We spend lots of money to do what is best and our dogs want nothing to do with it. Unless your dog is already used to wearing a harness, adaptation may take a little time. Training your dog to get used to a pet car harness is the best long-term solution. But what if you’re going on a trip soon and you don’t have the time? Try spraying the pet car harness with a chew deterrent spray. One of the best chew deterrent sprays on the market is Grannick’s Bitter Apple. This stuff has been around for over 50 years (developed in 1960). And in most cases, it really works.

Bitter Apple Chew Deterrent Spray for Dogs

There are some instances where dogs actually seem to like the taste, but the average success is 4 out of 5 stars. If you need to keep your dog in his harness so that he is safe, why not try using the Grannick’s Bitter Apple? It is non-toxic and the chances are your dog will hate it more than he hates his safety belt.

If time really is of the essence, a homemade chew deterrent may also work. Try mixing peppermint extract and water in a spray bottle. Or cayenne pepper and water, apple cider vinegar in water, or lemon juice in water. The Daily Puppy has some great recipes.

Remember, results will vary. Long term training is the best solution, but not always feasible if you’re pressed for time. Shorten the time by combining Bitter Apple with training. Simply follow our training tips for getting your dog used to a pet safety belt, but spray the harness with a chew deterrent.

Have you had to use a chew deterrent for your dog? If so, what kind? Did it work?

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July 24, 2014

Barks and Bytes Blog Hop

Welcome to the Barks & Bytes blog hop where the greatest pet bloggers join together and talk about their favorite topic – yep, you guessed it, pets. In my case, it’s dogs and dog safety.

Before I talk about the safety of my best pals, let me first thank Jodi with Heart Like a Dog and Linda with 2 Brown Dawgs for hosting this blog hop.

THANKS
In last week’s Bark & Bytes post I shared a cute video of my dogs Maya and Pierson in the car. Thank you so much Jodi and Linda for liking it and sharing it. It has had almost 50 views in just one week! And thank you, Suan and the gang with Life with Dogs and Cats for stopping by for a visit and commenting. You’re right, Lilah and Pierson do look a lot alike. They both have the same cute button noses, pierson eyes, fluffy coat and paws, and fluffy butt and tail. :)

Don't Leave Your Dog in the Car

Don’t do this to your dog, even if the weather is mild.

PET SUMMER SAFETY
Now on to the important safety stuff. Folks, I’ve been reading a lot of articles today about people leaving their dogs in their car while they run errands! This scares me so much!!! It’s hot out there!!!!! If you haven’t already, please stop by and like this Facebook page for Heat Can Kill Your Pet. Just Think First. It’s not my page, but a page I follow and they have a lot of great information about how dangerous and yet still common this practice is. They also have tips on what you can do about it, like calling the police, asking the store owner to announce it, leaving a flyer from My Dog is Cool, and/or by staying with the car until authorities or the owner arrives. I would not recommend confronting the owner yourself. People get very defensive, especially when that person is not an authority figure. They will only rationalize their actions and not really hear what you’re saying. So let a police officer or an animal control officer handle it. If the dog is truly having a heat emergency, be very careful should you decide to break the car window. It is illegal. I believe there is only one state that says it is legal if you are saving someone or an animal in distress.

Dog Left in Hot Car

We have a new article writer for Pet Auto Safety. Her name is Patrice. I may have introduced her before. She has written a great article on this and other pet summer safety topics titled, 9 Do’s and Don’ts of Summer Travel with Your Dog. Please go check it out and share. She’s a great writer, isn’t she?

Here are some pet summer safety tips from Pet360:

Pet Summer Safety Infographic from Pet360

NEW PET TRAVEL PRODUCT
Shortly after writing last week’s Barks & Bytes, I had a woman named Deb call me about her new product, the Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat. I’ve talked many times about the Backseat Bridge and the new Pet Dek, but the pet travel flat seat, I think, is even better. It is completely flat and there are far fewer gaps! I haven’t had a chance to try it out yet, but will be getting it by the end of this week or early next. Deb is an entrepreneur who designed the pet travel flat seat herself. She is working with her family in order to try to get it on the market. So even if this isn’t something you need, share it with your friends! I love helping out the individual business owner, especially when they have such great pet products.

Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat

Look how flat the portable pet travel flat seat is. It is strong yet thin, not bulky.

THANKS AGAIN!
Thanks again for stopping by the Barks & Bytes blog hop! If you still don’t have your pet fix, check out the posts form these other great bloggers:

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July 17, 2014

Barks and Bytes Blog Hop

Welcome to Barks & Bytes where we share recent activities at Pet Auto Safety.com. Barks & Bytes is hosted by our favorite dog bloggers, Jodi with Heart Like a Dog and Linda with 2 Brown Dawgs. Be sure to check them out, but not before you see what’s been going on with us!

NEW PET TRAVEL VIDEO

I’ve finally finished the dog video I started several months ago of Maya and Pierson in the car. This is the 3rd video (episode 2) of a series of videos. I’ve only had a little practice editing videos so I’m not sure this one is very good, but we are our own worst critics. Maybe, just maybe, you’ll really like it. And if you do, please hit the like button on YouTube and leave a comment. :)

NEW PET TRAVEL PRODUCTS

Dog Backpacks

As you saw from our June Barks & Bytes, we’ve been in the process of adding several new products to our Pet Auto Safety site. One that we mentioned but didn’t have available yet is our dog backpacks. Check out our Outdoor Dog Gear page and see what we have.

The Rein Coat

I also mentioned the Rein Coat. I’m sorry to say that we don’t have it available on our site yet. I’ve asked if I could sell them and the company said yes, but they haven’t gotten back with me with more information yet. I think they forgot about me.

One of my greatest fans for PetAutoSafety saw our FaceBook post about the Rein Coat and asked if her dog Lily could wear it along with her dog car harness. Lily has terrible anxiety in the car and her mom, whose name is Lee, was hoping the Rein Coat could help. Unfortunately, the folks at Rein Coat said that although their product has been known to help dogs with anxiety in the car, it was not designed to be used with a dog seat belt.

The Car Pet Dek with Dogs Maya & Pierson

Maya and Pierson try out the new Pet Dek.

The Pet Dek

We wrote a more detailed post about Maya and Pierson’s experience with the Pet Dek, so be sure to check out the July 10th post. As always, we share both the pros and cons of the products we sell so that you have as much information as possible, should you decide to purchase.

Cocker Spaniel in Red Car-Go Pet Car Travel Shelter

Maya and Pierson wish they were small enough to ride in this Car-Go pet travel shelter.

Car-Go

We did not talk about the Car-Go in our previous Barks & Bytes post because we didn’t know about it then. But I saw a great review from Oz the Terrier and so called the company that makes the Car-Go to see if they would let me sell it on Pet Auto Safety. I’m happy to say that they said yes! And so the Car-Go Single and the Car-Go Double is now available.

Maya and Dog First Aid Kit

Maya used this much smaller dog first aid kit from Kurgo when she was injured in June (more on American Dog Blog).

Hiking Travel Pet First Aid Kit

Look at how much stuff is in this pet first aid kit!

Pet First Aid Kits

This is another new product we didn’t mention on our last post but have added. This pet first aid kit is the most comprehensive first aid kit for dogs that I’ve ever seen. It has been put together by an entrepreneur named Denise. Denise is an amazing woman who teaches pet first aid and CPR and is also an author of a number of books, including Pet First Aid for Kids!

Dog Maya with Bottle 'n Bowl Bag

It’s easy to keep Maya hydrated on walks with this easy-to-carry water bottle bag.

Dog Travel Bowls & Bottles

Yesterday we added two new travel products related to water. The cuee blue paw print water bottle with rollerball tip and the Bottle ‘n Bowl bag with collapsible dog bowl. These two items can be found on our pet travel bowls page.

Bella Kurgo Go-Tech Dog Car Harness and Sweater

Isn’t Bella adorable in her new sweater?! She’s also wearing the Kurgo Go-Tech dog car harness.

BELLA & THE KURGO GO-TECH DOG CAR HARNESS

Bella’s mom purchased the Kurgo Go-Tech dog seat belt last year and had some concerns about the looped tether. She said Bella was awfully uncomfortable with the way the looped tether worked so I sent her a Bergan tether. To be honest, I am not a fan of Kurgo’s looped tethers either. In fact, when Maya wore her Kurgo Go-Tech harness, I immediately replaced the looped tether with the Bergan one. It is believed that the more restrictive a dog car harness is, the safer it is for the dog. This may be so, because if you stop suddenly or swerve, you don’t want your dog to get tossed around. But this sort of restriction can be very uncomfortable for dogs. Safety is important, but we need to consider the comfort of our best friend as well.

NEW PET TRAVEL ARTICLES

Last month I mentioned Patrice, our new writer for Pet Auto Safety. She has created another new great article for us that we posted on July 8th. I also have another great article written by Lindsay with That Mutt, which posted on July 15th. Be sure to check out these great pet safety articles and leave us a comment. :)

That’s all the Barks & Bytes I have for you this week. Thank you so much for stopping by!

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Five Dangers Dogs Present In Cars

Author: MayaAndPierson
July 1, 2014
Dog Distraction Clicking Cartoon

Like cell phones, dogs can be a dangerous distraction in the car.

1) Dog distractions which could cause a car wreck:
-Nosing, licking, or otherwise pestering the driver.
-Trying to climb in the lap of the driver.
-Pacing back and forth from car window to window.

Don't Let Your Dog Put Head Out Window

If I were actually driving with my dog Maya having her head out the window, she could be hurt by flying debris or choked if I stop suddenly.

2) Injury to the dog or other passengers:
-Injury to your dog’s eyes or nose from flying debris when their head is out the window.
-Broken bones, internal injuries, trauma, or death due to sudden stop, violent swerve, or car wreck.
-If a car wreck occurs, your dog could become a deadly projectile which could kill them and possibly harm other passengers.

3) Escaping the vehicle:
-Jumping out of a moving vehicle causing injury to themselves and possibly causing a wreck from you stopping suddenly or from other cars trying to avoid hitting them.
-A dog that is projected from or escapes from a wrecked vehicle could cause another wreck when he goes into the road.

4) Breaking the law:
-While it may not be against the law in all states to have your dog unseatbelted, if law enforcement sees that your dog is a distraction you may be ticketed for unsafe driving.

5) Stress to your dog:
-Unharnessed or uncrated dogs can get stressed out in a car. Stopping, turning, etc can prevent them from keeping their balance. They don’t understand all the movements and can be stressed by it.
-Dogs can get carsick – especially little dogs who can’t see out the window.
-A stressed dog can vomit or make other types of messes in your car.
-Don’t leave your dog alone in the car, even in mild weather. Heat dangers, stress from being left alone, stress from being harassed by a passerby, danger of being stolen.

Our message does not mean that you shouldn’t take your dog with you in the car. We just want you to think about you and your dog’s safety when they are in the car. Consider a dog car seat belt, keeping them in a crate or pet car seat, or putting up a pet barrier between the front and back seats in order to keep them in the back. For more information on dog car safety, visit our pet travel safety articles page.

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Dog Car Seat Belts: Safe or Unsafe

Author: MayaAndPierson
June 18, 2014
Maya ClickIt Utility Dog Seat Belt

The ClickIt Utility was rated the number one safest dog car harness by The Center for Pet Safety in 2013.

In 2013, Subaru of America and the Center for Pet Safety teamed up to test dog safety-harnesses. Their main goal was to ensure pets are kept safe while being transported and that each manufacturer’s claims of “crash protection” are valid, and able to perform as promised. Throughout the 2013 Safety Harness Crashworthiness Study, a range of harnesses, which the manufacturers claimed were “Testing”,“Crash Testing” or offered “Crash Protection”, were tested to determine if their statements were true and correct.

It should be noted, the Center for Pet Safety ran a preliminary crash study test in 2011. Four safety harnesses were tested. All four failed to provide proper protection for their canine counterpart. Admittedly, this study was not thorough enough to provide helpful statistical information regarding the use of safety harnesses, as only four undisclosed brands were tested, while there were over a dozen brands on the market at the time. The unintended, yet virtuous, outcome of this testing is that many of the top harness manufacturers have become more rigorous with their own safety testing, and have made improvements to their existing products.

Out of the seven brands that were found to be stable enough to test in the 2013 study, the clear top performer is the Clickit Utility, which is manufactured by Sleepypod. While the Clickit Utility provides the best protection against car accidents, it limits range of motion to the extreme. Some dogs may get anxious if forced to use the Clickit Utility, which may cause them to panic and hurt themselves or encourage chewing through the safety device. That being said, some dogs may not mind the harness, or with proper training could be desensitized to wearing it. While the Clickit Utility passed the test with flying colors, it isn’t for every dog. There are other options that met the safety standards set in place by the Center for Pet Safety, like Klein Metal’s AllSafe Harness or Cover Craft’s RuffRider Roadie.

The danger associated with auto accidents does not only apply to our pets. Safety regulations for people regarding seatbelt use has been in place for decades, yet there are many cases in which the use of a seatbelt has caused injury or has still resulted in death. Each car accident is unique, and no matter how much safety testing is done, there is always a risk involved. This does not stop people from wearing seatbelts, and it should not stop us from strapping our dogs in.

Having extra protection, such as a dog car safety harness, not only provides peace of mind, but keeps dogs in place. At the very least, your strapped in dog will be less of a distraction while you are driving, reducing your risk of getting into an accident in the first place. There are other methods to restrain your dog in the car, such as crates, barriers, fencing and screens. These will also help provide distraction-free driving, but they have not been properly tested, and it cannot be concluded that they will keep your pet safe in the case of an accident.

The Center for Pet Safety is leading the way in discovering the best way to keep people and their pets safe while traveling. Their research is still in an early phase, with only two studies under their belt. Without prior data, it is hard to conclude what testing method will provide the most accurate information. The methods will surely be modified in the future, meaning we will be able to make more informed decisions regarding the safety of our dogs as time goes on.

By Patrice Marrero

Source: Newswire Today

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Holiday Dog Songs

Author: MayaAndPierson
December 24, 2013

Dog Christmas Present

We’re enjoying our stay in Texas for the holiday, so instead of writing a long detailed post we thought we’d share some previous years’ posts. These are from our other blog:

Instead of the twelve days of Christmas, how about singing the twelve shelter dogs of Christmas?

On the first day of Christmas,
The shelter adopted out a puppy:
A great dog with a mixed pedigree.

On the second day of Christmas
The shelter adopted out a puppy:
Two Beagle loves,
And a great dog with mixed pedigree.

And so on with the final verse as follows:

On the twelfth day of Christmas
The shelter adopted out a puppy:
Twelve Setters sitting,
Eleven pointers pointing,
Ten Chows a-wagging,
Nine poodles prancing,
Eight hounds a-baying,
Seven Labs a-swimming,
Six Pugs a-playing,
Five Golden Retrievers,
Four bird dogs,
Three French Poodles,
Two Beagle loves,
And a great dog with mixed pedigree.

(c) Dawn Ross 2009

Here is a fun dog version of the Jingle Bells song:

Dashing through the snow
Loving to go and play
Wagging my tail to and fro
Barking all the way
Bells on my collar ring
While prancing in snow so white
What fun it is to jump and play
On a day so fun and bright
Oh, Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh what fun it is to play in the fluffy snow all day

The following photos are from previous holidays. We will have newer holiday photos soon.

Sephi and Mocha Playing with Christmas Bear

My dog Sephi and my sister’s dog Mocha are playing nicely together with a Christmas bear.

Maya Christmas Bow

Do you put holiday ribbons on your dog after all the presents are unwrapped?

 

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Follow Up Friday #22

Author: MayaAndPierson
December 13, 2013

Follow Up Friday Banner Logo

Is it Friday already? Where has the week gone? Well, let’s see by checking out this week’s edition of Follow Up Friday hosted by Jodi from Heart Like a Dog.

LAST FRIDAY

Flea from Dog Treat Web with the delicious Jones Natural Chews said, “I’m so glad the bark control collar works for Pierson! Hoorah!!! He sure does look miserable, but my babies give me the same look.

Isn’t it just the most adorable look? No, I don’t like my dogs to be miserable, but he is miserable from having to wear the antlers for an entire half minute while I took pictures. He doesn’t seem to be bothered by the bark collar except when he wants to bark but has to exercise self-control.

Maya Antlers Sleigh

Maya wasn’t as miserable wearing her antlers, at least not at first. ;)

Linda with 2 Brown Dawgs said, “Hubby and I have spent many a Thanksgiving by ourselves when family has been far away. Those can be fun too.

To be honest, I kind of like the relaxing holidays at home when I don’t have family obligations. But then again, being with family is nice too.

TRAVELING BY CAR WITH OUR DOGS

Ann with My Pawsitively Pets says, “Great tips! I think the tire thing is pretty important… I remember going on a trip as a kid with my parents and we got a flat tire in the middle of no where. After the spare was on, another tire decided to go flat not long after lol.

OMD! A car breaking down on a long road trip is a terrible experience. Sephi and I got stuck in Idaho once on a road trip from Kansas to Oregon. I was not married at the time so it was just me and her. Scary.

Donna and the Dogs said, “I just love that first photo! And I totally understand about wanting to drive so you can have your pups with you. We drove all the way to Florida – a two day drive – just so we could bring two of them along. We would have brought all three if we could have fit them!

Wow! A two day drive? I bet it was interesting seeing different parts of the country. Thanks for the compliment about Maya’s picture. She really is so photogenic, isn’t she? Here is another one of her riding in the car:

Maya Looking Between the Car Seats

The Backseat Bridge and the longer tether on her dog seat belt allows Maya to rest her head comfortably on the center console.

Snoopy with Snoopy’s Dog Blog said, “That’s a lot of organizing, but planning is the best way to ensure it all goes smoothly for all.”

We do it every year so it all goes smoothly now.

Lindsay with That Mutt said, “Great tips! It definitely helps if the pets are used to traveling, and it helps if they don’t get car sick. I have one cat that tends to get car sick, so he doesn’t get to eat breakfast the morning before a trip.

Pierson can handle highway driving pretty well. I didn’t have problems with him getting sick on our trip last year. So I will probably give him a little bit of breakfast before we go.

WIN A SEAT COVER

This contest for one of our paw print seat covers ends on Sunday so if you haven’t entered yet, you better go enter now. Plus, you can get at least three more additional entries by tweeting daily. There are only 176 entries so far so your chances are pretty good.

Paw Print Dog Seat Covers

Thanks for stopping by for Follow Up Friday! :) I hope all of you have a Wonderful Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

(This is a very busy month for me, so I may not be blogging as much for the rest of it. But I you will see more of me next year, for sure!)

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Poop Patrol While Traveling

Author: MayaAndPierson
November 18, 2013

Scoop That Poop Logo

Welcome to the Scoop that Poop blog hop hosted by Sugar the Golden Retriever. I can’t tell you enough about how important it is to pick up after your dog. This is especially important when you travel with them. Why? Because you want there to be more dog friendly places, right? Parks, rest stops, and hotels are going to be more open about allowing dogs if we pick up after them.

So the next time you travel with your dog, take poop patrol very seriously. Pick up your dog’s poo. If you see someone else’s dog left a little present in the grass or on the sidewalk, it would be really pawsome if you picked that up too. Yes, it is gross. But it is also easy to do.

Join the Scoop that Poop campaign and check out the poop patrol blog hop below.

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September 21, 2013

Some of you may have heard of this already, but if you see a dog with a yellow ribbon on their leash, it means the dog needs his space and you should not approach him. A dog can need extra space for a variety of reasons. Perhaps he is shy, is frightened of certain people or young children, just had surgery, has a tendency to snap, is working on obedience, or has leash reactive issues.

Yellow Ribbon Infographic

I only just recently heard of using a yellow ribbon for such dogs and can’t believe I haven’t heard of it before. Most people who read my personal blog know that my dog Pierson has leash reactive issues. He does not do well when he sees other dogs. A yellow ribbon might be a useful tool if more people knew what it meant.

If I am walking Pierson and we come across someone else walking their dog, I cross the street and I divert his attention with the “look” command and a treat in hopes that he will learn to associate seeing the other dog with good stuff.

Pierson on Leash Look Command

I also take Pierson on group walks where everyone in the group has a dog with a similar problem and we have all agreed to certain rules regarding our dogs’ interactions. While we walk together as a group, we walk spaced apart to whatever our own dog’s threshold level is. In Pierson’s case, he has to be at the end of the line. At first he had to be several yards behind but over time he has been able to get within a few feet of the dog in front.

Pierson Group Dog Walk

Look how close Pierson is able to get to other dogs now that we’ve been working with this dog walking group.

But what about cases where another person still let’s their dog approach Pierson? This has happened to me a few times. In two of the situations, the other dogs were not on leashes. In one situation, the person did not understand why I was crossing the street away from her and her dog and she really wanted to meet Pierson.

If more people knew about the yellow ribbons, perhaps the yellow ribbon could have given them advance notice. Some people are concerned about the negative view a yellow caution ribbon might mean. But if we help people understand it could be for a variety of reasons, not just aggression, I think it is a good idea. What do you think?

Keep in mind, however, that the yellow ribbon should not be used as an excuse to not do proper training. Pierson’s issue is being worked with and it will be much easier for me to alleviate his leash reactive behavior if I have complete control over who does and who doesn’t approach him. Another thing the yellow ribbon should not be used for is as a waiver of liability. If Pierson has a yellow ribbon on his leash and he still ends up hurting another dog, I am still liable.

The top infographic was found on http://gulahund.se/. Incidentally, gulahund means yellow dog in Swedish.

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